The Treason of the Intellectuals

Julien Benda (Author) Roger Kimball (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$63.54
Publisher
Routledge
Publish Date
October 15, 2006
Pages
244
Dimensions
6.32 X 0.69 X 8.88 inches | 0.95 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781412806237
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Julien Benda (1867-1956) was a novelist and critic. Among his other books are The Yoke of Pity and Uriel's Report.

Roger Kimball is co-editor and publisher of The New Criterion, president and publisher of Encounter Books, and an art critic for the London Spectator and National Review.

Reviews

"It is rich, quirky, erudite, digressive, and polemical. . . . Partisan in its claims for disinterestedness, it is ruthless in its defense of intellectual high-mindedness. . . . [G]iven the horrific events that unfolded in the decades following its publication, Benda's unremitting attack on the politicization of the intellect and ethnic separatism cannot but strike us as prescient. And given the continuing echo in our own time of the problems he anatomized, the relevance of his observations to our situation can hardly be doubted."

--Roger Kimball, The New Criterion

"It is rich, quirky, erudite, digressive, and polemical. . . . Partisan in its claims for disinterestedness, it is ruthless in its defense of intellectual high-mindedness. . . . [G]iven the horrific events that unfolded in the decades following its publication, Benda's unremitting attack on the politicization of the intellect and ethnic separatism cannot but strike us as prescient. And given the continuing echo in our own time of the problems he anatomized, the relevance of his observations to our situation can hardly be doubted."

--Roger Kimball, The New Criterion


-It is rich, quirky, erudite, digressive, and polemical. . . . Partisan in its claims for disinterestedness, it is ruthless in its defense of intellectual high-mindedness. . . . [G]iven the horrific events that unfolded in the decades following its publication, Benda's unremitting attack on the politicization of the intellect and ethnic separatism cannot but strike us as prescient. And given the continuing echo in our own time of the problems he anatomized, the relevance of his observations to our situation can hardly be doubted.-

--Roger Kimball, The New Criterion