Weird Ohio: Volume 1

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Product Details

Price
$22.95
Publisher
Union Square & Co.
Publish Date
Pages
256
Dimensions
9.28 X 9.28 X 1.3 inches | 2.68 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781402733826

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About the Author

James A. Willis was born and raised in Upstate New York. In 1999, he moved to Ohio and founded the Ghosts of Ohio (www.ghostsofohio.org), a nationally recognized paranormal research organization. James has been featured in numerous publications, television and radio programs, and live webcasts. He has given presentations throughout the state on how one may hope to find evidence of the existence of ghosts. James currently resides in Columbus with his Queen-loving parrot and the world's whiniest cat. When he's not seeking out all things weird and wonderful, James often stays awake nights wondering if he will ever lose the moniker of the Man Who Debunked Hell Town.Andrew Henderson is a writer and researcher who has been exploring Ohio's abandoned buildings, old cemeteries, ghost towns, ghost stories, and weird history for years. Since 1999, he has run the popular Web site Forgotten Ohio, and his first book, Forgotten Columbus, was published in 2002. His work has been featured both locally and nationally--most notably in the Washington Post. An alumnus of Ohio State University, Andrew lives in Columbus.

Loren Coleman has been investigating cryptozoology and unexplained phenomena since 1960. He is the author of more than two dozen books, including The Copycat Effect; Bigfoot! The True Story of Apes in America; The Field Guide to Lake Monsters, Sea Serpents, and Other Mystery Denizens of the Deep; Tom Slick, Mothman and Other Curious Encounters; Mysterious America: The Revised Edition; The Field Guide to Bigfoot, Yeti, and Other Mystery Primates Worldwide; and Cryptozoology A to Z. Having grown up in Illinois before moving to New England, Coleman often traveled to Ohio to investigate breaking cases and has continued to visit the state frequently for fieldwork and conferences.