Walking with Strangers: Critical Ethnography and Educational Promise

Available

Product Details

Price
$39.54
Publisher
Peter Lang Inc., International Academic Publishers
Publish Date
Pages
298
Dimensions
6.0 X 9.0 X 0.68 inches | 0.96 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781433110474

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About the Author

Barbara Dennis is a peace and social justice activist, and critical educational ethnographer. She is a professor of qualitative inquiry in the Inquiry Methodology program at Indiana University's, School of Education. She regularly publishes on feminist ethnography, critical participatory ethics, and methodological theory.

Reviews

"A must-read! Walking with Strangers is a stunning work, fully transforming traditional notions of social research. Barbara Dennis's many-sided brilliance as an activist, thinker, collaborative partner, and moral/ethical leader shines through the text, inspiring the reader with new ideas and optimism. Walking with Strangers gives an account of working with racial and linguistic diversity, a topic particularly poignant at this time when racist themes and violence in U.S. culture have risen and intensified. It is a profound work, both kind and firm in its authentic presentation of complexities, tensions, and dilemmas within human relationships. The pages are filled with startling philosophical insights brought forth by Dennis for the first time: story seeds, the identity shadow, a distinction between reconstruction and representation, contributions to our understanding of time, and the list goes on and on. Simultaneously, we are introduced to innovation after innovation in practices such as creative ways of using theatre, art, and conflict in the collaborative production of new knowledge. But all the massive creativity and intelligence in this book would mean little without the remarkable honesty in which it engages with the moral and ethical complexities of human pain, resistance, connection, and compassion." --Phil F. Carspecken, Professor, Indiana University