Voyages in the Underworld of Orpheus Black

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Product Details

Price
$17.99  $16.73
Publisher
Walker Books Us
Publish Date
Pages
320
Dimensions
6.7 X 8.3 X 1.3 inches | 1.85 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781536204377

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About the Author

Marcus Sedgwick (1968-2022) was the author of many celebrated novels for young adults, including the Michael L Printz award winning Midwinterblood. He was also shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal, the Edgar Allan Poe Award, the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize and was twice nominated for the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award.

Julian Sedgwick is a writer of many books for children, including the Mysterium trilogy, the Ghosts of Shanghai trilogy, and the graphic novel Dark Satanic Mills, cowritten with his brother, Marcus Sedgwick, and illustrated by John Higgins and Marc Olivent. Julian Sedgwick lives in England.

Alexis Deacon is the author of A Place to Call Home, Cheese Belongs to You!, and I Am Henry Finch, all illustrated by Viviane Schwarz. He is also an acclaimed artist and the illustrator of Jim's Lion and Soonchild by Russell Hoban. Alexis Deacon lives in London.

Reviews

Despite its complex crafting, the story never feels overwrought. It flows, grounded in character and the theme of preserving humanity from the machines of war. Even as Harry emerges from the abyss, a satisfying conclusion leads the reader from the darkness, delivering an emotional gut-punch that will provoke as much feeling as thought.
--Booklist (starred review)

Deacon's black and white artwork, which deftly handles literal scenes of London under bombardment and the feverish imaginings of Harry's injured brain, is by turns moving and appropriately troubling, and it will lure fans of World War II fiction to this moody tale.
--Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

The marriage of fantastical elements with the atrocities of war is not new, nor is World War II an unexplored literary topic, but this triptych treatment is interesting...readers who enjoy their war stories steeped in philosophy will walk away satisfied. A recommended purchase. Hand to fans of Markus Zusak's The Book Thief and even Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five.
--School Library Journal

Atmospheric and provocative.
--Kirkus Reviews