Unafrican Americans

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Product Details
Price
$34.50
Publisher
University Press of Kentucky
Publish Date
Pages
216
Dimensions
5.89 X 8.87 X 0.92 inches | 0.99 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780813120560

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About the Author

Tunde Adeleke is associate professor of history and director of Africana Studies at Loyola University.

Reviews

"An interesting treatment of black nationalism in the U.S." -- Booklist


"His thesis is certain to stir controvery and cause a rethinking of the African diaspora." -- Choice


"An important and pioneering book that will change the way American historians think about nineteenth-century black nationalism.... One of the most powerful rethinkings of black American nationalism that has been written in the past thirty years." -- Clarence Walker


"The strength of UnAfrican Americans is its author's frank presentation of the anti-African, or civilizationalist, face of its subjects." -- H-NET Book Review


"Lays bare, in provocative ways, some of the more troubling aspects of nineteenth-century black nationalism." -- Journal of American History


"In this fine exploration of the 'double consciousness' of the 'golden age' of black American nationalism, historian Tunde Adeleke makes an important contribution to the project to correct the monolithic perception of black nationalism as a counter culture movement fundamentally opposed to racial oppression." -- Journal of Intercultural Studies


"Passionate and well written, Adeleke's stunning reexamination of three 19th-century African Americans is bound to be controversial. With fresh lucid prose and wry wit, he brings to light the historic ironies and philosophical hypocrisies that continue to shape African and African American lives." -- Publishers Weekly


"He argues 19th century African Americans were no different than Euro-Americans: They wanted to colonize Africa and to establish a black homeland, but if established, this homeland would be based upon European, not African, civilization." -- The Griot