Toward Anti-Oppressive Teaching: Designing and Using Simulated Encounters

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Product Details
Price
$37.95
Publisher
Harvard Education PR
Publish Date
Pages
264
Dimensions
6.0 X 8.9 X 0.5 inches | 0.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781682535653

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About the Author
Elizabeth A. Self is an assistant professor of the practice in the Department of Teaching and Learning at Vanderbilt University's Peabody College. With an interest in the social foundations of education, she teaches courses in the elementary and secondary licensure programs that focus on philosophies of education, critical pedagogy, and the practice of teaching as situational and contextual. Her current research focuses on designing and using live-actor simulations to prepare teachers for anti-oppressive education. Her work on simulated encounters has been featured in Education Week, Chalkbeat, and on the TeachLab podcast series. Self earned her MEd in the Learning, Diversity, and Urban Studies program and her PhD in the Learning, Teaching, and Diversity program at Vanderbilt University's Peabody College. Barbara Stengel is a professor emerita of education at Vanderbilt University's Peabody College. A teacher educator since 1980, she is the author of Just Education: The Right to Education in Context and Conversation (Loyola University Press, 1991) and coauthor (with Alan Tom) Moral Matters: Five Ways to Develop the Moral Life of Schools (Teachers College Press, 2006). She has published her work related to teacher knowing, the moral dimensions of teaching and teacher education, and affect in educational interaction in various journals and handbooks, including Teaching Education, Educational Theory, Studies in Philosophy and Education, and The Handbook of Research on Teaching (5th ed., American Educational Research Association, 2016). Stengel is past president of the Philosophy of Education Society, has served on the executive board of the John Dewey Society, and is currently an associate editor of Educational Theory.