Three Somebodies: Plays about Notorious Dissidents: Scum Jack the Rapper Art Was Here

(Author)
Available
4.9/5.0
21,000+ Reviews
Bookshop.org has the highest-rated customer service of any bookstore in the world
Product Details
Price
$19.95  $18.55
Publisher
Three Rooms Press
Publish Date
Pages
192
Dimensions
5.8 X 0.2 X 8.9 inches | 0.6 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781941110546
BISAC Categories:

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate
About the Author
Kat Georges is an internationally known poet and playwright, who cofounded San Francisco's Marilyn Monroe Memorial Theater in 1992, where she served as co-artistic director for eight years. Her previous books include the poetry collections Our Lady of the Hunger, Punk Rock Journal, and Slow Dance at 120 Beats Per Minute. Her work has appeared in journals worldwide, including The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry (Thunder's Mouth Press), The Verdict Is In (as editor; Manic D Press), and Ladyland: Anthologie de Littérature Féminine Américaine (13E Note Editions). Her nonfiction prose has been published in San Francisco Examiner, Orange County Register, La Habra Daily Express, and more. She was born and raised in Southern California, where--following her graduation from California State University, Fullerton--she published The Eye Magapaper, an acclaimed music journal covering the SoCal punk scene in the early 80s. She is cofounder and codirector of Three Rooms Press and currently lives in New York City.
Reviews
Praise for THREE SOMEBODIES and Kat Georges "For those who enjoy the theater of the absurd. ... Brilliant in the abstract." --Library Journal

"Three spiked drinks which will take you places you've never been. Tangy and dangerous." --Dr. Larry Myers, Playwright, Jack Kerouac: Catholic

"These works of Kat Georges pack a real punch. That's an understatement. Each play reels the reader in with its energy and layers of art." --Ashley Adams, Passages North

"Kat Georges hungrily devours love, politics, memory, sex, feminism and whimsy and transforms them into a muscular poetry . . . an homage--not an imitation--to that black humor both the Surrealists and Dadaists championed. . . . Georges can dance on reality's knife edge without becoming the sliding onion." --Ron Dakron, author, Hello Devilfish!, Hammers

"Compelling writing that is urban and contemporary with humor in the mix." --Writing Thru It