Their Four Hearts

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Product Details
Price
$17.95  $16.69
Publisher
Dalkey Archive Press
Publish Date
Pages
204
Dimensions
5.98 X 8.9 X 0.71 inches | 0.75 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781628973969

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About the Author
Vladimir Sorokin was born in a small town outside of Moscow in 1955. He trained as an engineer at the Moscow Institute of Oil and Gas, but turned to art and writing, becoming a major presence in the Moscow underground of the 1980s. His work was banned in the Soviet Union, and his first novel, The Queue, was published by the famed émigré dissident Andrei Sinyavsky in France in 1983. In 1992, Sorokin's Collected Stories was nominated for the Russian Booker Prize; in 1999, the publication of the controversial novel Blue Lard, which included a sex scene between clones of Stalin and Khrushchev, led to public demonstrations against the book and to demands that Sorokin be prosecuted as a pornographer; in 2001, he received the Andrei Biely Award for outstanding contributions to Russian literature. He has written numerous plays and short stories, and his work has been translated throughout the world. Among his most recent books are Sugar Kremlin and Day of the Oprichnik. He lives in Moscow.
Reviews

Finalist, Russian Booker, 1992

"Generously spiced with filthy and vulgar terms... an absurdist work, a veritable encyclopedia of... the bizarre." --Liza Rozovsky

"Sorokin's sudden exposure is long overdue as he is probably both the most acclaimed and the most controversial author in Russia today, hailed by critics as a 'living classic' even as his subject matter takes the tradition of Russian grotesque into areas Gogol or even the Stalin-era absurdist Daniil Kharms never dared venture." --Daniel Kalder, Publishing Perspectives


Finalist, Russian Booker, 1992

"Generously spiced with filthy and vulgar terms... an absurdist work, a veritable encyclopedia of... the bizarre." -Liza Rozovsky

"Sorokin's sudden exposure is long overdue as he is probably both the most acclaimed and the most controversial author in Russia today, hailed by critics as a 'living classic' even as his subject matter takes the tradition of Russian grotesque into areas Gogol or even the Stalin-era absurdist Daniil Kharms never dared venture." -Daniel Kalder, Publishing Perspectives