The Works Of Horace

(Author)
Available
Product Details
Price
$16.99  $15.80
Publisher
Double 9 Books
Publish Date
Pages
172
Dimensions
5.5 X 8.5 X 0.4 inches | 0.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9789358018059

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About the Author
Quintus Horatius Flaccus (8 December 65-27 November 8 BC), who is known as Horace in English-speaking countries, was the most famous Roman lyric poet during Augustus's reign (also known as Octavian). The rhetorician Quintilian thought that his Odes were almost the only Latin songs that were worth reading. Horace also wrote beautiful hexameter verses (Satires and Epistles) and harsh iambic poetry (Epodes). The hexameters are funny and serious at the same time. They have a friendly tone, which led the ancient satirist Persius to say, ""While his friend laughs, Horace sneakily points out all his faults; once he's let in, he plays with your heartstrings."" During his lifetime, Rome went from being a republic to becoming an empire, which was a big change. Officer of the defeated republican army at the Battle of Philippi in 42 BC, he became friends with Maecenas, Octavian's right-hand man in civil matters, and became a spokesman for the new government. Some people thought that his relationship with the regime was a delicate balance that kept him very independent. C. Smart Christopher Smart was an 18th-century English poet and author. He was born in 1722 and began his studies at Pembroke College in Cambridge. Early on, Smart produced poetry that was religious, but he ultimately began writing about topics that were more secular and gained notoriety for his scathing and amusing work. In 1745, Smart moved to London and began writing pieces for publications like The Midwife and The Student. He was quickly selected to be editor of the literary magazine The Universal Visitor due to his reputation as a talented writer. Smart's personal life was chaotic. He was mentally ill, and he spent a lot of time in a facility. He continued to write despite his obstacles and produced some of his most well-known works at this period, including the devotional poem Jubilate Agno, which was not published until after his demise. The literary style of Smart was unique and often adventurous. He was widely renowned for integrating terms from several languages and neologisms in his poetry. His work had an impact on other poets, including as T.S. Eliot, who cited Smart as an inspiration. After Smart's death in 1771, the literary world utterly forgot him. Later, his work was rediscovered, and people today value it for its freshness and originality. Quintus Horatius Flaccus (8 December 65-27 November 8 BC), who is known as Horace in English-speaking countries, was the most famous Roman lyric poet during Augustus's reign (also known as Octavian). The rhetorician Quintilian thought that his Odes were almost the only Latin songs that were worth reading. Horace also wrote beautiful hexameter verses (Satires and Epistles) and harsh iambic poetry (Epodes). The hexameters are funny and serious at the same time. They have a friendly tone, which led the ancient satirist Persius to say, ""While his friend laughs, Horace sneakily points out all his faults; once he's let in, he plays with your heartstrings."" During his lifetime, Rome went from being a republic to becoming an empire, which was a big change. Officer of the defeated republican army at the Battle of Philippi in 42 BC, he became friends with Maecenas, Octavian's right-hand man in civil matters, and became a spokesman for the new government. Some people thought that his relationship with the regime was a delicate balance that kept him very independent. C. Smart Christopher Smart was an 18th-century English poet and author. He was born in 1722 and began his studies at Pembroke College in Cambridge. Early on, Smart produced poetry that was religious, but he ultimately began writing about topics that were more secular and gained notoriety for his scathing and amusing work. In 1745, Smart moved to London and began writing pieces for publications like The Midwife and The Student. He was quickly selected to be editor of the literary magazine The Universal Visitor due to his reputation as a talented writer. Smart's per...