The Walk

Available
Product Details
Price
$11.95  $11.11
Publisher
New Directions Publishing Corporation
Publish Date
Pages
89
Dimensions
4.4 X 0.4 X 6.8 inches | 0.2 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780811219921
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author
Robert Walser (1878-1956) was born in Biel, Switzerland. Among his four surviving novles in Jakob von Gunten.
For New Directions, Susan Bernofsky has translated Yoko Tawada's Where Europe Begins, The Naked Eye, and Memoirs of a Polar Bear (winner of the Warwick Prize for Women in Translation), eight titles by the great Swiss-German modernist Robert Walser, and five books by Jenny Erpenbeck, including The End of Days (winner of the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize). She is the author of Clairvoyant of the Small: The Life of Robert Walser, and teaches at Columbia University, where she also directs the literary translation program.
Reviews
Walser's project is mirrored and echoed by modernity's general obsession with interiority and exploring new forms of subjectivity. We should understand Walser's poetics of smallness as being as grandiose as anything that modernity has produced.
Incredibly interesting and beautiful.--John Ashbery
One of the most profound products of modern literature.--Walter Benjamin
The hope that shines forth in the moments of self-knowledge, transcendence, and grace Walser describes is anything but meager: on the contrary, it is exultation the writer feels when he perceives the sublime in the tiniest details of everyday life.
The Walk is a good place to start reading Walser, and offers a kind of bridge between the novels and the microscripts.... The walk is a search for freedom, is an act of freedom itself, and the writing feels free to launch into invective, or drape itself in courtesy, as it pleases. It is an attempt to approximate writing to life, to subject it to circumstance and chance encounter, but for all its overt artificiality the story is deeply affecting.