The Spaceman

(Author)
Available
4.9/5.0
21,000+ Reviews
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Product Details
Price
$17.99  $16.73
Publisher
Candlewick Press (MA)
Publish Date
Pages
40
Dimensions
8.6 X 10.3 X 0.4 inches | 0.85 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781536226164

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About the Author
Randy Cecil is the author-illustrator of Douglas, Duck, and many other highly acclaimed picture books. He is also the illustrator of James Howe's Brontorina and Tyrone O'Saurus Dreams; Elizabeth Bluemle's How Do You Wokka-Wokka? and My Father the Dog; Barbara Joosse's Girl and Dragon series, and numerous other books for young readers. He lives in Texas.
Reviews
Written from the spaceman's viewpoint, the narrative flows well from one discovery to the next. In Cecil's oil paintings, the colors become clearer and brighter as the story progresses, and so does the story's tone. Like the lovable spaceman himself, this is one of those quirky, original picture books that appeal to many adults as well as children. . . . A quirky, original picture book.
--Booklist (starred review)

This story ticks all the boxes. Clever narrative that humorously mimics 19th-century travelogues, check. Engaging illustrations that enrich and amplify, check. Endearing characters, double-check. . . . Humorous, poignant, and oh-so-satisfying.
--Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

With its openhearted protagonist and self-affirming ending, this sojourn celebrates the profound joy that comes with finally finding where one belongs.
--Publishers Weekly

The Spaceman is adorably orange, bald, and Muppet-like in his little spacesuit, and simple, smudged outlines for the hills, stars, and plants allow Cecil's oil illustrations to shine in all their textures. There's plenty of clever humor to be found in the Spaceman's dry, absurdly technical descriptions of our planet, and the premise encourages youngsters to reflect on everyday aspects of nature that are often taken for granted.
--The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books