The Revolt Against Humanity: Imagining a Future Without Us

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Available

Product Details

Price
$16.00  $14.88
Publisher
Columbia Global Reports
Publish Date
Pages
104
Dimensions
4.8 X 7.3 X 0.6 inches | 0.25 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781735913766

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About the Author

Adam Kirsch is an American poet and literary critic and the author, among other books, of The Revolt Against Humanity: Imagining a Future Without Us.

Reviews

"[A]n intense study of the various schools of thought on 'the end of humanity's reign on Earth.' ... [T]he expert perspectives, paired with anecdotes from sci-fi films and literature, make for a fascinating look at the 'profound civilizational changes' that may come. The result is a nice lay of the post-human land." --Publishers Weekly


"The Revolt Against Humanity is a profound, daring, and intellectually thrilling examination of the role of human beings on Earth: Would the world be better off without us? Beautifully written, the book will spark your thoughts, challenge your preconceptions, and leave you asking yourself wonderfully unanswerable questions." --Ellen Ullman, author of Close to the Machine and Life in Code


"We're told that ideas can have momentous consequences. In that case, we owe it to ourselves to pay close attention to the chilling ideas Adam Kirsch highlights in this profound and disturbing book. On one side, some environmental activists welcome the idea that humanity may be on the brink of extinction; on the other, a group of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs dreams of using their fortunes and technical knowhow to empower us to transcend our humanity altogether. Kirsch proves an illuminating guide to both trends. He's also an uncommonly insightful critic, drawing on the wisdom of poets, novelists, and philosophers to make sense of our unsettling attraction to the idea of a world without us." --Damon Linker, author of The Theocons and The Religious Test