The Painter and the President: Gilbert Stuart's Brush with George Washington

(Author) (Illustrator)
Pre-Order   Ships Aug 27, 2024
Product Details
Price
$18.99  $17.66
Publisher
Calkins Creek Books
Publish Date
Pages
40
Dimensions
0.0 X 0.0 X 0.0 inches | 1.25 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781662680007

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About the Author
Sarah Albee is the New York Times bestselling author of more than 150 books for children (some under pseudonyms). Her titles include Troublemakers in Trousers: Women and What They Wore to Get Things Done, which was named a New York Public Library Best Children's Book and a Bank Street Best Children's Book, Jane Goodall: A Champion of Chimpanzees, also named a Bank Street Best Children's Book, and Accidental Archaeologists: True Stories of Unexpected Discoveries, which won the Connecticut Book Award. She lives in Connecticut and Brooklyn with her husband and three children.

Stacy Innerst is a painter, children's book artist, and educator. His books have been honored with the Sydney Taylor Award for The Book Rescuer: How a Mensch from Massachusetts Saved Yiddish Literature for Generations to Come, The New York Times/New York Public Library Best Illustrated Children's Books Award for Ruth Bader Ginsburg: The Case of RBG Vs. Inequality, the SCBWI Golden Kite for Picture Book Illustration for The Music in George's Head. His recent books for Calkins Creek include Jack Knight's Brave Flight, Saving Lady Liberty, and Lincoln Clears a Path.
Reviews
"The Painter and the President spotlights the relationship between America's first president and Gilbert Stuart, one of the many artists who tried to capture his image on canvas. By the time of Washington's presidency, Stuart had made a fine reputation as a portraitist. Although many of his subjects loved sitting for him, the laconic George Washington was not one of them. Sarah Albee and Stacy Innerst cleverly celebrate this relationship by looking at the many ways the painter tried in order to get a true portrait of America's first president."--Mary V. Thompson, research historian emerita, George Washington's Mount Vernon