The New Bostonians: How Immigrants Have Transformed the Metro Area Since the 1960s

Available
Product Details
Price
$33.54
Publisher
University of Massachusetts Press
Publish Date
Pages
304
Dimensions
6.3 X 9.0 X 0.8 inches | 0.9 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781625341471

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About the Author
Marilynn S. Johnson is professor of history at Boston College. She is author of numerous books, including Street Justice: A History of Police Violence in New York City. Please see Johnson's website at http: //www.thenewbostonians.com/
Reviews
"Many researchers and scholars have hinted at, talked about, and explored the possibility of writing a history of the new immigrants in the Boston area. Johnson has taken on this prodigious task and produced a very strong piece of work."--Paul Watanabe, University of Massachusetts Boston

"The Boston case is a special one, as the city has been neglected by immigrant historians, except for the pre-1945 era and the issues of religion and politics. Johnson is bringing to light another history, one of immigration in recent years."--David Reimers, author of Unwelcome Strangers: American Identity and the Turn against Immigration

"The book is well written and organized, makes for interesting reading, and presents a thoughtful and balanced interpretation. Recommended."--Choice

"Drawing from a rich, multidisciplinary literature, including scholarly and journalistic work, archival research, and the oral histories of several ethnic groups, this well-structured and comprehensive study offers an impressive depth of historical and empirical data about Boston and its suburbs: histories, demographic structure, urban and social geographies, urban economy/ethnic entrepreneurship, patterns of community life, immigrant religion, political incorporation, urban planning, challenges, and changing urban landscapes. . . . Johnson has delivered an innovative, well-organized book of interest to academics and nonacademic alike."--Journal of Urban Affairs