The Interloper: Lee Harvey Oswald Inside the Soviet Union

Available

Product Details

Price
$43.20
Publisher
Basic Books
Publish Date
Pages
288
Dimensions
6.4 X 9.47 X 1.0 inches | 1.07 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780465021819

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About the Author

Peter Savodnik's writing has appeared in Harper's, Time, the New York Times, the Atlantic Monthly, and many other publications. Formerly based in Moscow, he has traveled and reported extensively in the former Soviet Union. Savodnik holds a master's from the University of Chicago and lives in Washington, DC.

Reviews

Booklist
"Savodnik busts a few myths along the way; for example, pointing out that the notion that the Russians would use Oswald as a Manchurian Candidate-style programmed assassin is absurd. But his real interest lies in presenting a picture of Lee Harvey Oswald the man, not merely the murderer. A very welcome addition to the voluminous literature about the Kennedy assassination."

Library Journal
"Recommended for all who remain fascinated by Oswald, the Kennedy assassination, Cold War narratives, or infamous criminals."

Harvey Klehr, co-author of Spies: The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America
"A riveting account of a troubled loner's embrace of communism as an answer to his psychological problems. Savodnik further discredits the conspiracy theorists who have long posited an elaborate plot behind the Kennedy assassination, and reminds us yet again how often history is changed by one deranged man."

Richard Pipes, Professor of History, Emeritus, Harvard University
"The Interloper is a meticulously researched account of the three years spent in the Soviet Union by Lee Oswald, a semi-literate failure who could find a home neither in his native America nor in the USSR. It explains a great deal about the psyche of the man who robbed us of John F. Kennedy."
National Review
"The accumulation of quotidian detail in The Interloper will startle even hard-core assassination buffs. The rendering of Oswald as a real man, a fathomable character with grandiose thoughts and primal urges, favorite books and private hurts, a tragic childhood and a diffident personality, is Peter Savodnik's great accomplishment.

Dallas Morning News
"The most original and interesting book to appear in this season of commemoration... Savodnik's re-creation of Oswald's time in Russia is brilliant."

Texas Monthly
"The best new book on the assassination."

Times, London
"A much-needed account of Lee Harvey Oswald... Savodnik's book is good enough (and it is very good) to allow the reader sometimes to draw different conclusions from those of the writer."

Publishers Weekly
"Savodnik here delivers a genuine biography that emphasizes the nearly three years Oswald spent in the Soviet Union and attempts to address the oft-neglected question of why he wanted to kill the President.... Savodnik's impressive research...paints an intriguing portrait of a restless, tormented soul who accomplished little in a short life until he turned himself into an infamous historical figure."
Editor's Choice, New York Times Book Review
"An incisive study of a pivotal sojourn."

New York Times Book Review
"[A] penetrating study of Oswald's pivotal sojourn in the Soviet Union."

The Economist
"An exemplary biography of Lee Harvey Oswald.... A finely drawn picture.... Mr. Savodnik knows how to bring to life the dull grey world of the Soviet provinces. With a knack for characterisation, he turns his subject into a real person: unattractive, unfortunate and often violent.... Obsessives will doubtless quibble with Mr. Savodnik's calm analysis. For others, the messy, contradictory and ultimately tragic story he tells will ring true."

Vanity Fair
"A deep probe into the sketchy backstory of the triggerman."

Washington Post
Most investigators of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy have worked to tie Lee Harvey Oswald to physical evidence or to suspicious relationships. In The Interloper, Peter Savodnik does something simpler: He explains Oswald's motive. After all this time, hasn't that been the most vexatious question?