The Good Drone: How Social Movements Democratize Surveillance

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Product Details

Price
$30.00
Publisher
MIT Press
Publish Date
Pages
324
Dimensions
5.4 X 8.0 X 0.8 inches | 0.79 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780262538886

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About the Author

Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick is Associate Professor of Political Sociology at the Kroc School of Peace Studies at the University of San Diego and concurrent Rights Lab Associate Professor of Social Movements and Human Rights at the University of Nottingham's School of Sociology and Social Policy.

Reviews

"The Good Drone's very engaging, accessible, and timely account of the importance of material, not just digital, technologies to social movements, is a must-read for anyone interested in understanding how technologies present new opportunities and perils for protesters."
- Jennifer Earl, sociologist and coauthor of Digitally Enabled Social Change

"ChoiFitzpatrick brings deep thought and research together with years of practical experience in writing this insightful account of technology's effects on politics and politics' effects on technology."
- Steven Livingston, Director of the Institute for Data, Democracy, and Politics, George Washington University

"It's hard to know where to start in praise of The Good Drone, but why not with the drone. Just when movement scholars thought they had awakened to the implications of the digital revolution, along comes Choi-Fitzpatrick challenging us to theorize the impact of drones and other cutting-edge technologies on the dynamics of contention. Then there is the inherent fascination of the cases he explores. But for my money, the last chapter of the book is alone worth the price of admission. In it, he sets the new technologies aside to remind us that technology has always powerfully shaped contention, with a compelling revisionist tour of social movement theory to make his case."
- Doug McAdam, Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor of Sociology, Stanford University