The Girl Who Fell from the Sky

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Product Details
Price
$16.95
Publisher
Algonquin Books
Publish Date
Pages
272
Dimensions
5.4 X 8.1 X 0.7 inches | 0.55 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781616200152

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About the Author

Heidi Durrow is a graduate of Stanford, Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism, and Yale Law School. She is the recipient of several fellowships including one from the New York Foundation for the Arts and a Jerome Foundation Fellowship for Emerging Writers. She won top honors in the Lorian Hemingway Short Story Competition and the Chapter One Fiction Contest. Her writing has appeared in Alaska Quarterly Review, the Literary Review, Yale Journal of Law, Feminism, Essence, and Newsday. She is the recipient of Barbara Kingsolvers Bellwether Prize for Literature of Social Change.

Reviews
Stunning . . . What makes Durrow's novel soar is her masterful sense of voice, her assured, nuanced handling of complex racial issues--and her heart."
The Girl Who Fell from the Sky can actually fly . . . Its energy comes from its vividly realized characters . . . Durrow has a terrific ear for dialogue, an ability to summon a wealth of hopes and fears in a single line.
The Girl Who Fell from the Sky is that rare thing: a post-postmodern novel with heart that weaves a circle of stories about race and self-discovery into a tense and sometimes terrifying whole."

"An auspicious debut . . . [Durrow] has crafted a modern story about identity and survival."
--Washington Post

"The Girl Who Fell from the Sky can actually fly. . . Its energy comes from its vividly realized characters, from how they perceive one another. Durrow has a terrific ear for dialogue, an ability to summon a wealth of hopes and fears in a single line."
--The New York Times Book Review

"A heartbreaking debut . . . keeps the reader in thrall."
--Boston Globe

"[An] affecting, exquisite debut novel . . . Durrow's powerful novel is poised to find a place among classic stories of the American experience."
--Miami Herald

"Hauntingly beautiful prose . . . Exquisitely told . . . Rachel's tale has the potential of becoming seared in your memory."
--Dallas Morning News

"Rachel's voice resonated in my reading mind in much the same way as did that of the young protagonist of The House on Mango Street. there's an achingly honest quality to it; both wise and naive, it makes you want to step between the pages to lend comfort."
--NPR's Morning Edition

"Stunning . . . What makes Durrow's novel soar is her masterful sense of voice, her assured, nuanced handling of complex racial issues--and her heart."
--The Christian Science Monitor

"The Girl Who Fell from the Sky is that rare thing: a post-postmodern novel with heart that weaves a circle of stories about race and self-discovery into a tense and sometimes terrifying whole."
--Ms.

The Girl Who Fell from the Sky can actually fly. . . Its energy comes from its vividly realized characters, from how they perceive one another. Durrow has a terrific ear for dialogue, an ability to summon a wealth of hopes and fears in a single line. --The New York Times Book Review
-- "Dallas Morning News"
A heartbreaking debut . . . keeps the reader in thrall. --Boston Globe
-- "NPR's Morning Edition"
[An] affecting, exquisite debut novel . . . Durrow's powerful novel is poised to find a place among classic stories of the American experience. --Miami Herald
-- "The Christian Science Monitor "
Hauntingly beautiful prose . . . Exquisitely told . . . Rachel's tale has the potential of becoming seared in your memory. --Dallas Morning News
-- "The New York Times Book Review "
Rachel's voice resonated in my reading mind in much the same way as did that of the young protagonist of The House on Mango Street. there's an achingly honest quality to it; both wise and naive, it makes you want to step between the pages to lend comfort." -- "Ms. Magazine "
An auspicious debut . . . [Durrow] has crafted a modern story about identity and survival."