The Case of the Bad Apples

(Author) (Illustrator)
Available
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Product Details
Price
$18.99  $17.66
Publisher
Creston Books
Publish Date
Pages
48
Dimensions
6.1 X 9.0 X 0.4 inches | 0.55 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781939547767

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About the Author
Robin Newman was a practicing attorney and legal editor but she now prefers to write about witches, mice, pigs, and peacocks. She lives in New York.
Deborah Zemke grew up near Detroit, Michigan. She has written and illustrated many books for young readers. She currently lives in Columbia, Missouri. Learn more about Deborah at www.deborahzemke.com.
Reviews

"More hard-boiled hilarity, this time with a side of apples.

In their third case, mice Detective Wilcox and Capt. Griswold, esteemed Missing Food Investigators, look into the latest 'bad apple' on the farm. The action starts with a call from a doctor at Whole Hog Emergency Care. It seems Porcini 'pigged out' on a basket of apples that may have been deliberately poisoned! For the MFIs, that's a Code 22--better known as 'attempted hamslaughter.' The detectives rush to the scene of the crime to get the 411 and 'save [Porcini's] bacon.' At the pig's pen, they find the basket (with four remaining apples) and a series of hoof, claw, and paw prints. The MFIs quickly narrow down the suspects to fellow farm animals Sweet Pea (another pig), Herman the Vermin (a rat) and Hot Dog (a dog, natch). But whodunit? Forensics will reveal the truth. With a successful formula established in earlier series entries, this one's par for the course. The five chapters range in text complexity, reaching 23 lines at most per page. Full-color cartoon spot illustrations provide contextual clues and break up the text. Though yellow sticky notes define slangy terms like 'tox screen'and 'perp, ' the abundant wordplay is perhaps best deciphered by more confident readers.

Completely 'pig-dic-u-lous'--and a whole lot of fun. (recipe)"--Kirkus Reviews

-- (6/9/2020 12:00:00 AM)