The Call of Cthulhu: And Other Stories

Available

Product Details

Price
$18.00  $16.74
Publisher
Liveright Publishing Corporation
Publish Date
Pages
432
Dimensions
6.1 X 9.1 X 1.2 inches | 1.25 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781631498398

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About the Author

H.P. Lovecraft was a master of horror and gothic fiction, influencing a generation of writers and creating dark worlds that still haunt the speculative fiction of today. In his early years Lovecraft corresponded with amateur writers and editors, wrote essays, poetry and reviews for amateur magazines. In the 1920s he began to sell to the popular pulp magazines of the day, like Weird Tales and Astonishing Tales.

LESLIE S. KLINGER is the two-time Edgar(R) winning editor of New Annotated Sherlock Holmes and Classic American Crime Fiction of the 1920s. He has also edited two anthologies of classic mysteries and, with Laurie R. King, five anthologies of stories inspired by the Sherlock Holmes Canon. Klinger is the series editor of Library of Congress Crime Classics, a partnership of the Library of Congress and Poisoned Pen Press/Sourcebooks. He is a former Chapter President of the SoCal Chapter of the Mystery Writers of America and lives in Malibu, California.

Reviews

Lovecraft's stories remain as harrowing and strange as they ever were, and their enduring influence makes them essential reads for horror fans. Klinger's annotations provide valuable context about Lovecraft's influences and the time in which he wrote, but they are perhaps most fascinating in their focus on the recurring themes found in his work . . . Klinger's annotations help to identify and track these thoughts, sometimes referencing Lovecraft's own notes and letters in helping readers unravel the author's complicated web of preoccupations. What emerges, alongside 10 excellent short stories, is a fuller understanding of Lovecraft's disturbing belief that humanity is an insignificant species when measured against the ancient, malign universe.--Hank Stephenson "Shelf Awareness"