The Black Friend: On Being a Better White Person

Available

Product Details

Price
$17.99  $16.73
Publisher
Candlewick Press (MA)
Publish Date
Pages
272
Dimensions
5.5 X 8.3 X 1.1 inches | 0.92 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781536217018

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About the Author

Frederick Joseph is the coauthor of Better Than We Found It: Conversations to Help Save the World, with Porsche Joseph. He is also the author of Patriarchy Blues: Reflections on Manhood, a collection of essays and poetry and an instant New York Times bestseller, and the picture book Black Panther: Wakanda Forever: The Courage to Dream, illustrated by Nikkolas Smith. An award-winning activist, philanthropist, and marketing professional, Frederick Joseph was named to the 2019 Forbes 30 Under 30 list, is a recipient of the Bob Clampett Humanitarian Award, and was selected for the 2018 Root 100, an annual list of the most influential African Americans. He lives in New York City with his wife, Porsche, and their dog, Stokely.

Reviews

For young white people who want to be better, who want to be anti-racist, who want to be people who are striving to recognize and even take down the structures of racism.
- Ibram X. Kendi, author of Stamped from the Beginning, on NPR's Morning Edition

With clear, powerful prose and a gentle dose of humor, The Black Friend is essential reading for anyone wishing to be part of a better world. I absolutely loved this book.
--Julie Klam, New York Times best-selling author

The Black Friend is THE book everyone needs to read right now. Frederick Joseph has written an essential window into the movement toward anti-racism. Read it, absorb it, and be changed because of it.
--Angie Thomas, author of The Hate U Give

For every white person who ever wanted to do better, inside this book, Frederick Joseph offers you both the tools and the chance.
--Jacqueline Woodson, Winner of the Hans Christian Andersen Award

Toward the end of The Black Friend, Frederick Joseph writes that his book is 'a gift, not an obligation.' I respectfully disagree. This book should be an obligation for white people, especially white parents, because we must raise anti-racist kids who will never be perpetrators of or bystanders to white supremacy and who will never mistake tolerance or appropriation for respect. Don't skip the painful parts--read every word.
--Chelsea Clinton, author, advocate, and vice chair of the Clinton Foundation

Typically, books on being an antiracist methodically walk readers through systemic racism and its related terminology, but Joseph takes a more personal, and perhaps more effective, approach, sharing stories from his time in school and college to provide cultural history and opportunities for reflection...To reinforce many of his points, Joseph includes interviews with writers, activists, and other influencers from multiple intersections. Finally, he calls on white people to become active accomplices, rather than passive allies, in the fight. Readers can find more explanations of terms and movements in the concluding "Encyclopedia of Racism," as well as a "The Black Friend Playlist" and People and Things to Know roster. A hard-hitting resource for action and change.
--Booklist (starred review)

Gearing this volume toward white people "who want to be better," Joseph offers anecdotes about his experiences with racism and white supremacy...Interviews with author Angie Thomas, journalist Jemele Hill, and others contribute discussions on the problem with "color blindness" and the importance of personal growth, among various topics. In a genial, assured tone, Joseph invites and encourages readers to reflect on their own behavior, move toward anti-racism, and implement change.
--Publishers Weekly Online (starred review)

Part memoir, part guidebook, this title explores scenarios of interpersonal and institutional struggle to introduce the next generation of White youth to anti-racism...The language strikes a congenial yet firm tone, recognizing that those who have made it this far are to be met with genuine intention; his message is that it's about becoming better and understanding how your own behavior and knowledge are critical to leveraging the change needed to overhaul oppressive systems. Joseph navigates the sensitivity of such a project and poses a sincere question that challenges the long-held promise of reading amid widespread injustice: "If I show people how they're hurting others, will some of them be willing to change?" Here's to many readers digging in to find out. A smartly researched, well-intentioned provocation to inspire change.
--Kirkus Reviews