The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking

Available

Product Details

Price
$19.00  $17.67
Publisher
Picador USA
Publish Date
Pages
256
Dimensions
5.43 X 8.29 X 0.7 inches | 0.51 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781250860408

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About the Author

Oliver Burkeman is a feature writer for The Guardian. He is a winner of the Foreign Press Association's Young Journalist of the Year Award and has been short-listed for the Orwell Prize. He wrote a popular weekly column on psychology, "This Column Will Change Your Life," and has reported from New York, London, and Washington, D.C. His books include Four Thousand Weeks: Time Management for Mortals and The Antidote: Happiness for People who Can't Stand Positive Thinking. He lives in New York City.

Reviews

"Burkeman's tour of the 'negative path' to happiness makes for a deeply insightful and entertaining book. This insecure, anxious and sometimes unhappy reader found it quite helpful." --Hector Tobar, The Los Angeles Times

"Some of the most truthful and useful words on [happiness] to be published in recent years . . . A marvellous synthesis of good sense, which would make a bracing detox for the self-help junkie." --Julian Baggini, The Guardian

"The Antidote is a gem. Countering a self-help tradition in which 'positive thinking' too often takes the place of actual thinking, Oliver Burkeman returns our attention to several of philosophy's deeper traditions and does so with a light hand and a wry sense of humor. You'll come away from this book enriched--and, yes, even a little happier." --Daniel H. Pink, author of Drive and A Whole New Mind

"Quietly subversive, beautifully written, persuasive, and profound, Oliver Burkeman's book will make you think--and smile." --Alex Bellos, author of Here's Looking at Euclid

"Addictive, wise, and very funny." --Tim Harford, author of The Undercover Economist

"What unites [Burkeman's] travels, and seems to drive the various characters he meets, from modern-day Stoics to business consultants, is disillusionment with a patently false idea that something as complex as the goal of human happiness can be found by looking in a book . . . It's a simple idea, but an exhilarating and satisfying one." --Alexander Larman, The Observer

"This is an excellent book; Burkeman makes us see that our current approach, in which we want happiness but search for certainty--often in the shape of material goods--is counterproductive." --William Leith, The Telegraph

"Fascinating . . . After years spent consulting specialists--from psychologists to philosophers and even Buddhists--Burkeman realised they all agreed on one thing: . . . in order to be truly happy, we might actually need to be willing to experience more negative emotions--or, at least, to learn to stop running so hard from them." --Mandy Francis, The Daily Mail

"Splendid . . . Readable and engaging." --British Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, The Times (London)