Someday You Will Understand: My Father's Private World War II

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Product Details

Price
$24.95  $23.20
Publisher
Arcade Publishing
Publish Date
Pages
320
Dimensions
6.0 X 9.1 X 1.3 inches | 1.05 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781628723779

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About the Author

Nina Wolff Feld is the daughter of Walter C. Wolff, who went on to found the Bon Marché furniture stores in New York. A native New Yorker, she received a B.S. in Fine Art from Skidmore College and a Bachelor of Architecture from the Pratt Institute School of Architecture. During the 1980s her paintings became a part of the East Village and Soho art scene and are privately collected internationally. She has given talks on the subject of this book to schools, libraries, JCCs, and temples in the New York area as well in Washington, DC, and lives with her family in New York.

Reviews

"Nina Wolff Feld reimagines with thrilling verve her father's life as a fugitive from Nazi Germany who returned to Europe from the United States as a refugee soldier. Besides her giving us an act of filial devotion par excellence, we are grateful to her for so deftly filling in one more blank in the vast nightmare of World War II. She has transformed a cache of letters written by her father to his family into a goldmine of unique historic interest." --John Guare, playwright, author of Six Degrees of Separation and A Free Man of Color

"Both intimate in detail and sweeping in reach, Someday You Will Understand is a moving and often humorous story that Walter Wolff kept to himself until his final days when he gave his daughter the letters and photographs that recorded his odyssey. This is Nina Wolff Feld's book, but it is her father's life."
--Alan Riding, author of And the Show Went On: Cultural Life in Nazi-Occupied Paris

"What appears at first glance as a daughter's tribute to an extraordinary father becomes a testimony to the achievement of a group of immigrants who rightfully stand with America's 'greatest generation.' They came from the countries ruled or occupied by the Nazi hordes and became the staunch defenders of American democracy within months. They donned the uniform of their country of asylum, fought the battles of World War II and contributed, with gratitude, to the growth of their new country. This books tells this little-told story in a clear style, factually, yet with empathy and love." --Guy Stern, distinguished professor emeritus, director, International Institute of the Righteous, Holocaust Memorial Center

"Nina Wolff Feld tells the compelling story of a family's truly dramatic, last-minute escape through France and Spain from the clutches of the Nazis and of her father's return as an American GI after 1945 to interrogate suspected perpetrators. Richly illustrated, this book will captivate anyone interested in the European catastrophe of the 1940s." --V. R. Berghahn, Seth Low Emeritus Professor of History, Columbia University

"A daughter's compelling account of her father's wartime journey--a sensitive exploration of a family's hidden history." --Anne Nelson, author of Red Orchestra

"An extraordinarily important story . . . a fascinating look into the experiences of an ordinary GI [that is] also the story of a refugee . . . finally able to return to his country years after being forced to flee." --Alexandra M. Lord, The Ultimate History Project

"A dying father's wartime army box yields a wealth of lively detail about American intelligence work in POW and displaced persons camps within the ruins of Europe. . . . Along with Wolff's intimately chronicled accounts of the devastation from bombings and the homelessness of Jews and others, the accompanying photographs he took himself reveal stirring remnants of an apocalypse."--Kirkus Reviews

"Feld strings together the events that shaped history with a personal touch . . . [Her father's] extraordinary journey grants us new insight into how a government run amok disenfranchised an entire generation." --San Francisco Book Review