Seeing Red

(Author) (Translator)
Available

Product Details

Price
$14.95  $13.90
Publisher
Deep Vellum Publishing
Publish Date
Pages
168
Dimensions
5.2 X 8.2 X 0.6 inches | 0.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781941920244

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About the Author

Lina Meruane is one of the most prominent female voices in Chilean contemporary narrative. A novelist, essayist, and cultural journalist, she is the author of a host of short stories appeared in various anthologies and magazines in Spanish, English, German and French. She has also published a collection of short stories, Las Infantas (Chile 1998, Argentina 2010), as well as three novels, Póstuma (Chile 2000, Portugal 2001), Cercada (Chile 2000) and Fruta Podrida (Chile & México 2007). The latter won the Best Unpublished Novel Priza awarded by Chile´s National Council of the Culture and the Arts in 2006. She is the winner of the Anna Seghers Prize, awarded to her by the Akademie der Künste, in Berlin, Germany, 2011. Meruane received the prestigious Mexican Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz Prize in 2012 with the publication of her most recent novel, Sangre en el ojo (Seeing Red).
Meruane has received writing grants from the Arts Development Fund of Chile (1997), the Guggenheim Foundation (2004) and National Endowment for the Arts (2010). Meruane is a cultural journalist, columnist and stringer for written media, and currently serves as editor of Brutas Editoras, an independent publishing house located in New York City. Holder of a Ph.D. in Latin American Literature from New York University, Meruane currently teaches World and Latin American Literature and Creative Writing at NYU.

Megan McDowell is a literary translator of many modern and contemporary South American authors, including Alejandro Zambra, Arturo Fontaine, Carlos Busqued, Álvaro Bisama, and Juan Emar. Her translations have been published in The New Yorker, McSweeney's, Words Without Borders, Mandorla, and Vice, among others. She lives in Santiago, Chile and New York.

Reviews

One of Publishers Weekly's "10 Essential 21st-Century Spanish-Language Books" An Entropy Magazine "Best of 2016: Fiction Books" selection Included in World Literature Today's "75 Notable Translations of 2016" A Foreword Reviews Reviewers' Choice Selection for "14 Favorites of 2016"

"Blurring the lines between fiction and memoir, Meruane's first novel translated into English explores mortality, identity, and personal transformation. . . . This is a penetrating autobiographical novel, and for English-Language readers this work serves as a stunning introduction to a remarkable author." -- Publishers Weekly

"Astonishing...Meruane's authorial gaze is unflinching. . . . Lina resists all attempts to corral her into victimhood and insists on wielding her agency like a weapon...Seeing Red becomes a searing commentary on the limits of family relationships and the cruelty that, under duress, we are capable of exerting on those we love." -- Charlotte Whittle, The Los Angeles Times

"New York and her home town, Santiago, are described in prose that blends sensation with memory, fury with fear. The story reveals its truths through immediacy of description--viscous, repulsive, and beautiful." -- The New Yorker

"Perfect memory notwithstanding, blindness has affected Lina's relationships, especially the one with Ignacio, whom she alternately leans on, loves and envies for his undamaged eyes. These passages are the most uncomfortable to read because they show how truly vulnerable we are, how tightly bound is our sense of being physically whole to our sense of being being worthy and lovable." -- Beatriz Terrazas, The Dallas Morning News

"Intense, physical, flipping from sensual to gory, Seeing Red is a book about degeneration and offers an exhilarating "fresh eye", as the author puts it, on what it is to be alive." -- Joanna Walsh, The National

"In an autobiographical work full of discomfort, Meruane spares nothing negative, and Seeing Red is astounding and essential for it." -- Greg Walklin, Colorado Review

"Meruane's ability to take readers into the experience of sight loss is extraordinary. Her descriptions are fresh, immediate and memorable, inviting comparisons with passages from Nobel Prize winner José Saramago's great novel Blindness." -- Ann Morgan, A Year of Reading the World

"Aided by the fine translation from Megan McDowell, newcomers to Meruane's spare prose and caustic wit... will admire the strange force and clarity of this novel that is as painstaking as it is wryly painful." -- Forrest Roth, The Collagist

"a novel of genius and disturbing intelligence," -- Enrique Vila-Matas, Northwest Review of Books, in its Books of Note: February 2016

"A raw, sexy, visceral and sometimes brutal account of a woman losing her sight and it explores the immediate effects on her relationships with her lover, family, surroundings and her own body with an unflinching gaze." -- Kirsty Mcluckie, The Scotsman

"From this moment of darkness, the narrative hurtles forward, obsessed by Lina's physical and emotional pains, which are examined with a vibrant, Kahloesque fascination. The narrative is also interested in how Lina's pain stretches out, changing her relationships with the objects and people around her." -- M. Lynx Qualey, Electric Lit

"An intriguing short novel . . . A female writer who is losing her sight probes the meaning of language, genre, and the reader's expectations. . . . Meruane fashions a challenging metafiction that ventures into fresh and provocative places." -- Kirkus Reviews

One of Literary
"Astonishing . . . Meruane's authorial gaze is unflinching. Through the mesh of veins, she holds a microscope not only to the condition suffered by her alter ego, but to the ties between the protagonist and those on whom she is forced to depend, ties strained by Lina's history of illness and her loss of sight. Lina resists all attempts to corral her into victimhood and insists on wielding her agency like a weapon. Her manipulations of Ignacio provide a visceral antidote to infantilizing narratives of illness; Lina's behavior is predatory rather than passive, and Seeing Red becomes a searing commentary on the limits of family relationships and the cruelty that, under duress, we are capable of exerting on those we love." -- Charlotte Whittle, Los Angeles Times

"Susan Sontag famously wrote that there are only two nations: the one of the healthy and the one of the sick. Meruane's corrosive writing is a meditation on a soul blinded not by illness, but by the peculiar destructive spirit produced by self-pity - that dark feeling familiar to any who has suffered their own body's treason. In other words, all of us. Seeing Red's spine is a deliciously perverse love story, loaded with surprising, sickening, wonderful erotic material centred in the eyeballs." -- Álvaro Enrigue (author of Sudden Death), TANK Magazine Summer Reading List 2016

"An enigmatic mixture of autobiography and fiction . . . The story reveals its truths through immediacy of description--viscous, repulsive, and beautiful." -- The New Yorker

"A story told by Meruane with vivid, unflinching language that will occasionally make readers squirm with its beautiful, brutal honesty. . . . Would we, as Lina did, ask our loved one for one of his eyes, thereby making "us equal, turn us into mirror images for the rest of our lives until death?" Might we, in the throes of passion yearn to suck the very eyes out of our lover, as Meruane writes, "to take possession of them on my palate"? These lines make us fidget, no doubt. Maybe that's because we don't want to know what emotions hide in the dark corners of our own hearts." -- Beatriz Terrazas, Dallas Morning News

"Intense, physical, flipping from sensual to gory, Seeing Red is a book about degeneration and offers an exhilarating 'fresh eye', as the author puts it, on what it is to be alive." -- Joanna Walsh, The National

"Blurring the lines between fiction and memoir, Meruane's first novel translated into English explores mortality, identity, and personal transformation. . . . This is a penetrating autobiographical novel, and for English-Language readers this work serves as a stunning introduction to a remarkable author." -- Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)

"From this moment of darkness, the narrative hurtles forward, obsessed by Lina's physical and emotional pains, which are examined with a vibrant, Kahloesque fascination. The narrative is also interested in how Lina's pain stretches out, changing her relationships with the objects and people around her." -- M. Lynx Qualey, Electric Lit

"The writing is jagged, sharp, and direct, serving as a counterpoint to the careful movements and stillness prescribed for our heroine. Short chapters of dense blocks of text shape the novel into a bristling, staccato torrent of vivid imagery and psychological roilings... Lina's chronicle is simultaneously disturbing and lyrical." -- Rachel Jagareski, Foreword Reviews

"Seeing Red is not only a story about becoming blind, it is a story about fear, trust, and the limits of love. The reader will walk on these pages as if blind, surrounded by sharp objects that inflict pain, nostalgia, loneliness#1;