Savage Town

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Product Details

Price
$16.99  $15.80
Publisher
Image Comics
Publish Date
Pages
152
Dimensions
6.5 X 0.3 X 10.1 inches | 0.6 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781534302464
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Declan Shalvey is an award-winning artist/writer from Ireland. Over his career, Shalvey has illustrated hit titles such as Batman, Deadpool, Punisher, Moon Knight as well as the acclaimed graphic novel series INJECTION with writer Warren Ellis for Image Comics. Since moving into writing, he has gained credits such as, Deadpool VS Old Man Logan, SAVAGE TOWN, and BOG BODIES. Jordie Bellaire is a multiple Eisner Award winning colorist for acclaimed projects such as VISION, THEY'RE NOT LIKE US, PRETTY DEADLY, INJECTION, AUTUMNLANDS etc, as well as mainstream hits like BATMAN, DEADPOOL, MOON KNIGHT and HAWKEYE. She is writer and co-creator with artist Vanesa R. Del Rey on the ongoing Image Comics series REDLANDS and is the writer on Buffy the Vampire Slayer comic book series. She lives in Ireland with her famous cat, Buffy.

Reviews

BOOKLIST -- Image Comics' original graphic novel is dedicated to Steve Dillon, and, indeed, it captures an echo of the late British artist's collaborations with writer Garth Ennis on various crime sagas. Here working-class family man Jimmy Savage is navigating his way around the Hogans and the Dawsons, the two leading crime families of Limerick, Ireland. Jimmy is small time but has big ideas and is bucking for the top, and through various vicious schemes and betrayals, he appears to be on his way. The story offers a blue-collar social realism that paints an authentic sense of place and a believable portrait of Jimmy and his crowd, whose dialogue comes in a torrent of regional slang, which sometimes requires careful parsing. Jimmy, meanwhile, is by no means a sweetheart, as his bloody response to his oldest friend's betrayal attests. The art, though, softens the lines of its figures and uses the thick-jawed faces and occasional black-dots-for-eyes style reminiscent of old-time comic strips, effectively blunting the edges of the grim brutality with a cushion of visual innocence.