Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive (Revised)

Available
Product Details
Price
$23.95  $22.27
Publisher
Zone Books
Publish Date
Pages
176
Dimensions
5.9 X 8.9 X 0.7 inches | 0.65 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781890951177

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About the Author

Jeffrey Karl Ochsner practices architecture in Houston.

Reviews
-- Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley
" Agamben's moving text on the Nazi death camps asks what happens to speech when the deracinated subject speaks. Although some say that Auschwitz makes witnessing impossible, Agamben shows how the one who speaks bears this impossibility within his own speech, bordering the human and the inhuman. Agamben probes for us the condition of speech at the limit of the human, evoking the horror and the near unspeakability of the inhuman as it witnesses in language its own undoing." -- Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley
& quot; Agamben's moving text on the Nazi death camps asks what happens to speech when the deracinated subject speaks. Although some say that Auschwitz makes witnessing impossible, Agamben shows how the one who speaks bears this impossibility within his own speech, bordering the human and the inhuman. Agamben probes for us the condition of speech at the limit of the human, evoking the horror and the near unspeakability of the inhuman as it witnesses in language its own undoing.& quot; -- Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley
"Agamben's moving text on the Nazi death camps asks what happens to speech when the deracinated subject speaks. Although some say that Auschwitz makes witnessing impossible, Agamben shows how the one who speaks bears this impossibility within his own speech, bordering the human and the inhuman. Agamben probes for us the condition of speech at the limit of the human, evoking the horror and the near unspeakability of the inhuman as it witnesses in language its own undoing."--Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley