Religion Is Raced: Understanding American Religion in the Twenty-First Century

Available

Product Details

Price
$118.80
Publisher
New York University Press
Publish Date
Pages
344
Dimensions
6.0 X 9.0 X 0.94 inches | 1.42 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781479808670

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Grace Yukich is Associate Professor of Sociology at Quinnipiac University and author of One Family Under God: Immigration Politics and Progressive Religion in America.

Penny Edgell is Professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota and author of Congregations in Conflict and Religion and Family in a Changing Society.

Reviews

"Challenges the unspoken narrative of whiteness that has shaped studies of US religion. Writing from various disciplinary perspectives, the authors collectively chart a more productive way forward, one that begins with very different (and more empirically accurate) assumptions. A state-of-the-art work and a shot across the bow."--Paul Harvey, author of Christianity and Race in the American South: A History
"An important collective endeavor that will leave its mark as an essential resource for understanding contemporary American religion. Yukich and Edgell bring together several of the best scholars in the sociology of religion in order to shed new light on neglected racial (but also religious, ethnic and gendered) aspects of religion as it is lived in the United States today. This is a crucial and overdue corrective and a significant achievement."--Michèle Lamont, Harvard University
"An incredibly rich, important and timely book. Yukich and Edgell, along with their powerhouse group of contributing authors, highlight crucial racial underpinnings and underlying organizing principals of contemporary religion and the consequences for social divisions, politics and identities. This book is a cornerstone, one that will shape scholarly work and public conversations for generations."--Vincent J. Roscigno, Ohio State University