Reading as Therapy: What Contemporary Fiction Does for Middle-Class Americans

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Product Details
Price
$45.94
Publisher
University of Iowa Press
Publish Date
Pages
258
Dimensions
5.9 X 0.7 X 8.9 inches | 0.79 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781587299551
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Timothy Aubry is an associate professor of English at Baruch College, where he specializes in twentieth-century American literature, contemporary fiction, modernism, feminism, and popular culture.

Reviews

Is literature a form of therapy? Should it be? Tim Aubry takes the familiar complaint about literature s therapeutic uses and patiently unfolds their hidden complexities in this lucid and eloquent book. Combining intellectual generosity with critical acumen, his argument offers fresh insight into contemporary fiction, middlebrow culture, and larger questions of how and why we read. Rita Felski, author, "Uses of Literature" "
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"Therapy" and the "therapeutic" as soon as one has laid these loaded terms alongside recent literary history, their explanatory value becomes self-evident, and Tim Aubry deserves credit simply for staging this encounter. And yet, such is the force of his readings of some of the exemplary texts of our therapeutic postmodernity, this initial insight keeps on giving, yielding surprise after surprise. As I approached the end of this highly readable, unpretentiously learned text, I was asking myself if the author hadn t in fact broken the code of contemporary American literature, or at least one of them. Mark McGurl, author, "The Program Era" "
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This lively and intelligent study makes a timely contribution to a well-worn subfield of American studies: the intellectual defense of middlebrow culture. With a sharp sense of irony, Tim Aubry asks how fiction is used for therapeutic or self-help purposes by contemporary American readers. The paradox is that part of what distinguishes middlebrow audiences from academics like himself is their respect for literature, but Aubry s own close readings of the works of contemporary writers are always sensitive and nuanced. Leah Price, author, "The Anthology and the Rise of the Novel" "
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"Is literature a form of therapy? Should it be? Tim Aubry takes the familiar complaint about literature's therapeutic uses and patiently unfolds their hidden complexities in this lucid and eloquent book. Combining intellectual generosity with critical acumen, his argument offers fresh insight into contemporary fiction, middlebrow culture, and larger questions of how and why we read."--Rita Felski, author, Uses of Literature



"Therapy and the therapeutic as soon as one has laid these loaded terms alongside recent literary history, their explanatory value becomes self-evident, and Tim Aubry deserves credit simply for staging this encounter. And yet, such is the force of his readings of some of the exemplary texts of our therapeutic postmodernity, this initial insight keeps on giving, yielding surprise after surprise. As I approached the end of this highly readable, unpretentiously learned text, I was asking myself if the author hadn't in fact 'broken the code' of contemporary American literature, or at least one of them."--Mark McGurl, author, The Program Era



"This lively and intelligent study makes a timely contribution to a well-worn subfield of American studies: the intellectual defense of middlebrow culture. With a sharp sense of irony, Tim Aubry asks how fiction is used for therapeutic or self-help purposes by contemporary American readers. The paradox is that part of what distinguishes middlebrow audiences from academics like himself is their respect for literature, but Aubry's own close readings of the works of contemporary writers are always sensitive and nuanced."--Leah Price, author, The Anthology and the Rise of the Novel