People of the City

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Product Details

Price
$15.95  $14.83
Publisher
New York Review of Books
Publish Date
Pages
176
Dimensions
5.0 X 7.9 X 0.6 inches | 0.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781681374291
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Cyprian Ekwensi (1921-2007) was born into an Igbo family in a small city in central Nigeria and raised in the country's rural southwest. He studied Yoruba culture at Ibadan University College before matriculating at the School of Forestry. While working as a forestry officer in 1945, he began writing short stories, which were soon anthologized in both Nigeria and England. In 1951 Ekwensi moved to London on a scholarship to study pharmacy; in 1954 he published his debut novel, People of the City. After his return to Nigeria, he worked at the Nigerian Broadcasting Company and married Eunice Anyiwo, with whom he had five children. At the outbreak of civil war in 1966, Ekwensi took a post in the secessionist Biafran government. All the while, he wrote hundreds of short stories and radio and television scripts, as well as dozens of novels, including Jagua Nana (1961) and Burning Grass (1962), two staples of the Nigerian high-school curriculum. In 1968 he was awarded the Dag Hammarskjöld International Prize in Literature, and in 2006 he became a fellow of the Nigerian Academy of Letters.

Emmanuel Iduma is the author of A Stranger's Pose, a travelogue, and The Sound of Things to Come, a novel. His stories and essays have been published widely. Born and raised in Nigeria, he teaches at the School of Visual Arts in New York, and divides his time between Lagos and New York.

Reviews

"Electric. . . . Ekwensi paints a vivid picture of cultural cacophony in a modernizing Nigeria filled with colonizers, revolutionaries, dreamers, and schemers. The mesmerizing tale and its feckless, frustrating protagonist provide stark glimpses into the class struggles, misogyny, and violence that often lurk beneath a bustling metropolis." --Publishers Weekly

"Lagos was a central character in much of Ekwensi's fiction, portrayed with undertones of the noir thriller, his episodic style mirroring the urgency and restlessness of the city. His lower-middle-class characters . . . are stripped naked in public, confront nasty landlords, battle inane bureaucracies, have pepper put into their vaginas, die of political violence, seduce powerful politicians, commit murder-suicides and contract sexually transmitted diseases; one senses verisimilitude in Ekwensi's unabashed melodrama. . . . The women did a lot of hip-swinging but they were often wonderfully bold." --Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, The Guardian

"People of the City tells the story of a young crime reporter who doubles as a bandleader in a large west African city. As one British critic wrote, the novel said more about west Africa than 50 government reports." --Shola Adenekan, The Guardian

"One of the most prolific African writers of the twentieth century." --Charles Larson

"Ekwensi saw [Nigeria's] contradictions more clearly than most. And he was unusual, at least among what we might call the first generation of Nigerian writers, in not merely depicting women as people in their own right, with their own wants and desires, but being unafraid to explore the kind of power they can exert over men. . . . He also remains the most cosmopolitan, the most at ease with exploring the 'existential loss' that is the modern Nigerian condition." --Adewale Maja-Pearce, The Baffler

"Throughout the novel, Ekwensi critiques are electric, his narrative is mesmerizing. As such, People of the City is a vivid tale of class struggle and identity reclamation in the shadows of colonialism's reign." --Elisabeth Woronzoff, PopMatters