Parnucklian for Chocolate

(Author)
Available
4.9/5.0
21,000+ Reviews
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Product Details
Price
$16.95  $15.76
Publisher
Red Hen Press
Publish Date
Pages
272
Dimensions
5.09 X 7.91 X 0.72 inches | 0.61 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781597097901

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About the Author
B.H. James was born and raised an only child in Galt, California. He attended Catholic schools and had a dog named Pepsi. He went to Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo where he majored in Sociology, which was slightly useless as he mostly took creative writing courses. He took too long to graduate, mostly due to his preoccupation with pursuing a career in amateur rodeo. Somewhere in his late twenties, he got tired of driving to and fro throughout the country catching steers, so he took a job teaching high school English in the International Baccalaureate program in Stockton, California, finding there his two loves: teaching and his wife, Liz, a fellow English teacher. B.H. holds a Master's of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from the University of Nebraska. It was there that Parnucklian for Chocolate, B.H.'s first novel, began to take shape. B.H. currently lives in Lodi, California with his wife, baby boy, and their cats Rooster and Mike Tyson.
Reviews
"Like Chauncey Gardiner in Jerzy Kosinski's "Being There", Josiah--the teenage protagonist in B.H. James' fantastically quirky debut novel, "Parnucklian for Chocolate"--is a bit of a blank slate. Raised and home-schooled by a pathological mother who tells him his father's an alien from the planet Parnuckle, Josiah bewilderedly bumbles through psych wards, group homes, and the sexual minefields of contemporary teenagerhood with a jejune artlessness that is simultaneously disturbing and heart-rending. In hypnotically rolling prose skewered throughout with sharp wit and details, James slyly unveils Josiah's alien and alienated perspective as a wide-eyed mirror to the minor horrors underlying suburban surfaces, a social anthropologist to the kitschy absurdities of contemporary pop culture, and an arbiter for the delusional, science-fictive nature of 'home' and 'family.'"
--Lee Ann Roripaugh, author of "On the Cusp of a Dangerous Year"
""Parnucklian for Chocolate" is a hilarious, ingeniously absurd coming-of-age tale. James'sentences are delightfully self-conscious and playful, clever but not too clever, and entirely original. His characters are often foolish, even pathetic, but they nevertheless manage to deliver a powerful message: that the power of the imagination is the only thing capable of saving lives."--Amy Hassinger, author of "The Priest's Madonna "and "Nina: Adolescence"
"The gradual awakening of a teenager whose mom protects him with a fanciful story reveals an unnecessarily cruel world. Josiah grows up believing, as his mother tells him, that he is the product of an alien abduction from the planet Parnuckle, whose inhabitants eat chocolate, never sleep, and don't need to bathe."
--"Publishers Weekly"
Like Chauncey Gardiner in Jerzy Kosinski s "Being There," Josiah the teenage protagonist in B.H. James fantastically quirky debut novel, "Parnucklian for Chocolate" is a bit of a blank slate. Raised and home-schooled by a pathological mother who tells him his father s an alien from the planet Parnuckle, Josiah bewilderedly bumbles through psych wards, group homes, and the sexual minefields of contemporary teenagerhood with a jejune artlessness that is simultaneously disturbing and heart-rending. In hypnotically rolling prose skewered throughout with sharp wit and details, James slyly unveils Josiah s alien and alienated perspective as a wide-eyed mirror to the minor horrors underlying suburban surfaces, a social anthropologist to the kitschy absurdities of contemporary pop culture, and an arbiter for the delusional, science-fictive nature of home and family.
Lee Ann Roripaugh, author of "On the Cusp of a Dangerous Year""
"Parnucklian for Chocolate" is a hilarious, ingeniously absurd coming-of-age tale. James sentences are delightfully self-conscious and playful, clever but not too clever, and entirely original. His characters are often foolish, even pathetic, but they nevertheless manage to deliver a powerful message: that the power of the imagination is the only thing capable of saving lives. Amy Hassinger, author of "The Priest s Madonna "and "Nina: Adolescence""

Josiah was told that his father was an important official from a planet called Parnuckle. Through his childhood Josiah wrote letters to the man, giving them to his mother to mail. Sometimes his father replied. Josiah had trouble at school when he told classmates and teachers who he was and where he was from. As the trouble escalated, the boy was sent to a group home and was eventually released into the custody of his mother and her fiance, Johnson Davis. Davis's daughter Bree immediately starts to take advantage of Josiah and his extreme naivete, introducing him to sex, drugs, and alcohol in the space of just a few weeks. When Josiah's "real" father appears at his door, light finally dawns for Josiah. VERDICT James, an English teacher, has published in various journals, but this is his first novel. His prose is convoluted. His characters are absurd. Yet this silly story has a charm all its own and infers that we are all, maybe, a little bit crazy. It will appeal to readers of the absurd and to those who appreciate comic coming-of-age stories.
Joanna Burkhardt, " Library Journal ""

A classic naif, Josiah is reminiscent of Chauncey Gardner in Jerzy Kozinski s satirical novella, "Being There." First novelist James seems to have similar satirical intent in his treatment of family and the condition, in Josiah s case, of being an outsider.
"Booklist""
Like Chauncey Gardiner in Jerzy Kosinski s Being There, Josiah the teenage protagonist in B.H. James fantastically quirky debut novel, Parnucklian for Chocolate is a bit of a blank slate. Raised and home-schooled by a pathological mother who tells him his father s an alien from the planet Parnuckle, Josiah bewilderedly bumbles through psych wards, group homes, and the sexual minefields of contemporary teenagerhood with a jejune artlessness that is simultaneously disturbing and heart-rending. In hypnotically rolling prose skewered throughout with sharp wit and details, James slyly unveils Josiah s alien and alienated perspective as a wide-eyed mirror to the minor horrors underlying suburban surfaces, a social anthropologist to the kitschy absurdities of contemporary pop culture, and an arbiter for the delusional, science-fictive nature of home and family.
Lee Ann Roripaugh, author of On the Cusp of a Dangerous Year"
Parnucklian for Chocolate is a hilarious, ingeniously absurd coming-of-age tale. James sentences are delightfully self-conscious and playful, clever but not too clever, and entirely original. His characters are often foolish, even pathetic, but they nevertheless manage to deliver a powerful message: that the power of the imagination is the only thing capable of saving lives. Amy Hassinger, author of The Priest s Madonna and Nina: Adolescence"

Josiah was told that his father was an important official from a planet called Parnuckle. Through his childhood Josiah wrote letters to the man, giving them to his mother to mail. Sometimes his father replied. Josiah had trouble at school when he told classmates and teachers who he was and where he was from. As the trouble escalated, the boy was sent to a group home and was eventually released into the custody of his mother and her fiance, Johnson Davis. Davis's daughter Bree immediately starts to take advantage of Josiah and his extreme naivete, introducing him to sex, drugs, and alcohol in the space of just a few weeks. When Josiah's "real" father appears at his door, light finally dawns for Josiah. VERDICT James, an English teacher, has published in various journals, but this is his first novel. His prose is convoluted. His characters are absurd. Yet this silly story has a charm all its own and infers that we are all, maybe, a little bit crazy. It will appeal to readers of the absurd and to those who appreciate comic coming-of-age stories.
Joanna Burkhardt, Library Journal

"

A classic naif, Josiah is reminiscent of Chauncey Gardner in Jerzy Kozinski s satirical novella, Being There. First novelist James seems to have similar satirical intent in his treatment of family and the condition, in Josiah s case, of being an outsider.
Booklist

"
The gradual awakening of a teenager whose mom protects him with a fanciful story reveals an unnecessarily cruel world. Josiah grows up believing, as his mother tells him, that he is the product of an alien abduction from the planet Parnuckle, whose inhabitants eat chocolate, never sleep, and don t need to bathe.
Publishers Weekly"