Newjack: Guarding Sing Sing

(Author)
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Product Details

Price
$18.00
Publisher
Vintage
Publish Date
Pages
352
Dimensions
5.32 X 8.02 X 0.8 inches | 0.57 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780375726620

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About the Author

Ted Conover is the author of several books including Newjack: Guarding Sing Sing(winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize) and Rolling Nowhere: Riding the Rails with America's Hoboes. His writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, The New Yorker, and National Geographic. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, he is Distinguished Writer-in-Residence in the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University. He lives in New York City.

Reviews

"An amazing book.... The stories are spellbinding and the telling is clear and cold."-The Washington Post Book World

"[Conover] has made us fully part of his experience.... It is hard to imagine any journalist doing this more daringly or effectively."-The New York Times

"A timely, troubling, important book."-The Baltimore Sun

"Newjack is a graphic and troubling window into society's scrapheap. Conover is to be commended for having the chops to venture where few others would dare go.... An important cautionary tale."-Los Angeles Times Book Review

"Newjack tells the straight skinny on a guard's life inside prison without being overly judgmental or cloyingly sentimental. It's experimental journalism at its best."-The Denver Post

"A devastating chronicle of the toll prison takes on the prisoners and the keepers of the keys."-Minneapolis Star Tribune

"An incisive and indelible look at the life of a corrections officer and the dark life of the penal system."-The Dallas Morning News

"A fascinating story.... Prison books crowd the shelves, but few tell the story from the point of view of the officers who spend eight hours a day doing time, hoping and praying that they make it home that night, hoping and praying that the job allows them to remain human."-The San Diego Union-Tribune