Miss Nelson Is Missing!

(Author) (Illustrator)
Available
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Product Details
Price
$9.99  $9.29
Publisher
Clarion Books
Publish Date
Pages
32
Dimensions
8.1 X 10.3 X 0.3 inches | 0.25 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780395401460

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About the Author

Harry Allard (1928-2017) was the author of many hilarious books for children, including several Miss Nelson and Stupid Family titles, all illustrated by James Marshall.

Dalek, aka James Marshall, is one of the most exciting artists from the burgeoning Brooklyn art scene. While he has received a BFA of the Art Institute of Chicago, he is especially inspired by street art, graffiti, and televisual culture. His work has been exhibitioned in London's Apart Gallery, in New York, and in the Museum of Contemporary Art in Washington. Furthermore, he worked with Takashi Murakami. He then successfully dedicated to his own career and has shown all over the world, from Los Angeles to Paris or Tokyo. Dalek has a heritage of street art and was assistant to the Japanese artist Murakami, and from those experiences he has kept two elements: an incredible force and an unequalled precision. As he himself says laconically "it's there and in full force...". By now, the Space Monkeys Dalek produced in his childhood have lived their share of history. Inspired by the cartoon series Dr. Who, the Daleks were born of an imagination developed by the artist very young. And if they seemed to some like "merciless assassins of humanity", Dalek plays on their somewhat misanthropic instincts. But underneath it all, the Space Monkeys are "more mischievous than dangerous".
Reviews
"Rarely has the golden rule been so effectively interpreted for children."--Booklist, ALA "If all teachers looked as goofy as Mr. Marshall makes these two, the earth would never again have a truancy problem."--The New York Times