Manitou: The Sacred Landscape of New England's Native Civilization (Original)

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Product Details
Price
$29.95  $27.85
Publisher
Inner Traditions International
Publish Date
Pages
400
Dimensions
6.7 X 0.9 X 9.9 inches | 1.45 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780892810789

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About the Author
James Mavor was an oceanographic engineer at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. He was one of the designers of the deep submersible Alvin, and he initiated the Minoan excavations on Thera, which culminated in the publication of Voyage to Atlantis. Byron Dix, now deceased, was an optical designer. For fifteen years they worked together researching New England anthropology and archaeo-astronomy.
Reviews
. . . among the few innovative advances in the field of New England archaeology in recent years . . . looks at a class of data which are ordinarily overlooked by both prehistorians and historians, and begins to fit them into a new paradigm . . . sensitively written and generally well-supported by documentary and excavational evidence.-- "Massachusettes Archaeological Society"
Through this work we see our landscape anew. Now when we go to the woods, where before we saw just low walls, we have learned to see stone mounds and marked trees, vigil places, pointer, marker, and god stones. Walking there has come to be an honoring of a time when all life was holy.-- "Nancy Jack Todd, Annals of the Earth"
This ground-breaking treatment, handsomely illustrated with photos, maps, and line drawings, will unquestionably propel the emerging field of American geomancy considerably forward. A contemplation of the manitou worldview, presented here with excellence and mature excitement, yields a radically different appraisal of a fundamental aspect of our national history and geography, while suggesting new land use and conservation parameters for the future.-- "Yoga Journal"