Mama's Girl

Available

Product Details

Price
$24.00
Publisher
Penguin Publishing Group
Publish Date
Pages
208
Dimensions
5.16 X 8.04 X 0.59 inches | 0.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781573225991

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About the Author

Veronica Chambers is a prolific author, best known for her critically acclaimed memoir Mama's Girl. She coauthored the award-winning memoir Yes, Chef with chef Marcus Samuelsson, as well as Samuelsson's young-adult memoir Make It Messy, and has collaborated on four New York Times bestsellers, most recently 32 Yolks, which she cowrote with chef Eric Ripert. She has been a senior editor at the New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, and Glamour. Born in Panama and raised in Brooklyn, she writes often about her Afro-Latina heritage. She speaks, reads, and writes Spanish, but she is truly fluent in Spanglish. She is currently a John S. Knight journalism fellow at Stanford University. Her upcoming novel is The Go-Between.

Reviews

"For any daughter who has ever loved and blamed Mama in the same anguished breath...triumphant."—Bebe Moore Campbell

"Moving...the story of a strong soul growing up."--USA Today

"While Mama's Girl skillfully traces the evolution of a complicated mother-daughter relationship, it is also a testament to the resilience of black women across generations."--Ms.

"A troubling testament to grit and mother love...While the story of her own achievement under grim, often violent circumstances is extraordinary, the reader is left feeling particularly grateful for [Chambers's] compassion. Her portrait of her Panamanian mother--proud, protective, angry, and in need--is one of the finest and most evenhanded in the genre in recent years."--The New Yorker

"Affecting and eloquent...Chambers's rise...is remarkable, as is her spare, lilting writing style...On the often painful circumstances she has faced--her mother's coldness, what it means to be black in the post-civil rights era--Chambers writes with probity. And she illustrates her thoughts with well-culled details that are telling and lyrically rendered: A."--Entertainment Weekly