Love & Whiskey: The Remarkable True Story of Jack Daniel, His Master Distiller Nearest Green, and the Improbable Rise of Uncle Nearest

(Author)
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Product Details
Price
$28.00  $26.04
Publisher
Melcher Media Inc
Publish Date
Pages
376
Dimensions
6.4 X 9.2 X 1.4 inches | 1.45 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781595911346

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About the Author
A serial entrepreneur for more than two decades, Fawn Weaver is America's first Black female CEO of a major spirit brand. She has written two previous books, Happy Wives Club and The Argument-Free Marriage, is a regular contributor to Inc., and has been interviewed on top shows in Canada, the United Kingdom, South Africa, Italy, Belgium, Australia, Ireland, Poland, Spain, and New Zealand on topics ranging from accelerating growth in business without losing your soul to creating a happy balance between work and family. Weaver currently serves on the board of Endeavor, is a member of the Young Presidents' Organization, the founder and chair of the Nearest Green Foundation, and a former executive board member of Meet Each Need With Dignity and Slavery No More.
Reviews
"Many contributions of enslaved men and women have only just started to be recognized. Entrepreneur Fawn Weaver has made sure at least one critical piece of the history is not forgotten." --Olivia B. Waxman, TIME magazine
"A vast history that was largely untapped - until now... The company's roots follow an unlikely camaraderie, born on a plantation. ... it wouldn't be until decades later after five generations of master blenders that Green's name would finally make its mark." --Deborah Roberts, ABC News
"I so admire Fawn Weaver. I'm thinking, if you need an investigation, we need to call her." --Gayle King, journalist and co-host, CBS This Morning
"Weaver didn't want to use Green to promote whiskey. Rather, she wanted to use whiskey to promote Green--and the idea that enslaved Black people were also a part of the story." -Clay Risen, reporter at The New York Times, writing for Bourbon+ Magazine