Literary Exile in the Twentieth Century: An Analysis and Biographical Dictionary

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Product Details
Price
$99.60
Publisher
Greenwood
Publish Date
Pages
880
Dimensions
6.14 X 9.21 X 1.74 inches | 2.66 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780313238703
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author
MARTIN TUCKER is Professor of English at the C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University. He is the author of two books, Africa in Modern Literature (1967) and Joseph Conrad (1976), and more than 15 volumes of literary encyclopedia, among them The Critical Temper, Moulton's Library of Literary Criticism (revised and corrected by Tucker), Modern British Literature, and Modern Commonwealth Literature. He has been the editor of Confrontation: A Literary Journal since 1968, and has received two fellowships for his editorial distinction. His volume of poems Homes of Locks and Mysteries was selected for inclusion in the prestigious English-Speaking Union's Books Across the Seas Program in 1982.
Reviews
"Tucker (C.W. Post Campus, Long Island University), editor of the literary journal Confrontation (1968-), and compiler of a number of literary encyclopedias for Ungar, e.g., The Critical Temper (5v., 1969-89), has put together this international guide to modern exiled writers. The main body of the text lists, alphabetically, entries for some 550 exiled writers, living and dead. A useful introductory essay explores the varied types of exile and the difficulty in defining the terms and in categorizing artistic victims and the ways their exile affects their work. The entries often continue this exploration, and cross-references are made when a shared exilic milieu exists. Since the selection is made to be a "representative survey" and full entries are provided only for those who have received "wide acceptance and high critical evaluation," a number of important writers are omitted, particularly women (e.g., Marjorie Agosin, Marta Traba, and Cristina Peri Rossi). Major figures are covered at length (Beckett, Conrad, and Lawrence get five to nine pages each), and most entries contain references to specific works influenced by or reflecting on exile as well as additional titles and sources of critical commentary at the end. Some short entries are questionable and lack explanation for their inclusion (e.g., Raymond Andrews and Italo Calvino), and some entries offer little analysis (Andrei Codrescu's entry is made up of excerpts from an interview and his autobiographical works). Additional sections list exiles by categories (e.g., gay and lesbian writers), and the appendixes cover additional categories and geographic points of departure and refuge. A valuable survey and biographicalsource."-Choice
"In detailing individual movements from the familiar to the foreign space and exploring the effect of exile on the specific literature that emerges from the specific journey, the contributing authors (more than 100) have done much to enrich and clarify for the reader some of the subtle similarities and vast differences among the experiences of 20th-century wanderers."-Phi Beta Kappa
?In detailing individual movements from the familiar to the foreign space and exploring the effect of exile on the specific literature that emerges from the specific journey, the contributing authors (more than 100) have done much to enrich and clarify for the reader some of the subtle similarities and vast differences among the experiences of 20th-century wanderers.?-Phi Beta Kappa
?Tucker (C.W. Post Campus, Long Island University), editor of the literary journal Confrontation (1968-), and compiler of a number of literary encyclopedias for Ungar, e.g., The Critical Temper (5v., 1969-89), has put together this international guide to modern exiled writers. The main body of the text lists, alphabetically, entries for some 550 exiled writers, living and dead. A useful introductory essay explores the varied types of exile and the difficulty in defining the terms and in categorizing artistic victims and the ways their exile affects their work. The entries often continue this exploration, and cross-references are made when a shared exilic milieu exists. Since the selection is made to be a "representative survey" and full entries are provided only for those who have received "wide acceptance and high critical evaluation," a number of important writers are omitted, particularly women (e.g., Marjorie Agosin, Marta Traba, and Cristina Peri Rossi). Major figures are covered at length (Beckett, Conrad, and Lawrence get five to nine pages each), and most entries contain references to specific works influenced by or reflecting on exile as well as additional titles and sources of critical commentary at the end. Some short entries are questionable and lack explanation for their inclusion (e.g., Raymond Andrews and Italo Calvino), and some entries offer little analysis (Andrei Codrescu's entry is made up of excerpts from an interview and his autobiographical works). Additional sections list exiles by categories (e.g., gay and lesbian writers), and the appendixes cover additional categories and geographic points of departure and refuge. A valuable survey and biographicalsource.?-Choice