Lincoln, Congress, and Emancipation

Available
Product Details
Price
$39.54
Publisher
Ohio University Press
Publish Date
Pages
276
Dimensions
6.0 X 9.0 X 0.63 inches | 0.91 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780821422281

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About the Author

Paul Finkelman is an expert on constitutional history, the law of slavery, and the American Civil War. He coedits the Ohio University Press series New Approaches to Midwestern Studies and is the president of Gratz College.

Donald R. Kennon is the former chief historian and vice president of the United States Capitol Historical Society. He is editor of the Ohio University Press series Perspectives on the History of Congress, 1789-1801.

Reviews
"Take ten talented historians of the Civil War era, lock them in a room, and let none of them out until they have said the most enlightening things ever uttered about Abraham Lincoln and emancipation, and the result would be close to what we have in this book. From the perspectives of political, demographic, and legal studies, these essays describe the essential factors in the Lincoln equation that destroyed that great blot on freedom's escutcheon--human slavery."--Allen C. Guelzo, author of Fateful Lightning: A New History of the Civil War and Reconstruction
"This fine collection of essays sets Abraham Lincoln's emancipation policies firmly and correctly within the larger contexts of global emancipation movements, the nation's socio-cultural environment, and the intricate currents of the nation's political and constitutional system. A must-read for any serious student of Lincoln's career or the Civil War era."--Brian Dirck, author of Abraham Lincoln and White America
"The uniformly high quality of the contributions and the range of issues covered render this work particularly suitable for course assignment. There is enough variety of perspective and topics to provide fodder for open-ended discussions while still