Lidia's Mastering the Art of Italian Cuisine: Everything You Need to Know to Be a Great Italian Cook: A Cookbook

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Product Details
Price
$40.00  $37.20
Publisher
Knopf Publishing Group
Publish Date
Pages
480
Dimensions
7.71 X 10.22 X 1.68 inches | 2.73 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780385349468

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About the Author
LIDIA MATTICCHIO BASTIANICH is the author of twelve previous books and the Emmy award-wining host of Public Television's Lidia's Kitchen which also airs internationally in territories that include Mexico, Canada, the Middle East, Croatia, and the UK. She is also a judge on Masterchef Jr. Italy, and owns Felidia, Becco, and several other restaurants, and is a partner in the acclaimed Eataly in New York, Chicago, and Sao Paolo, Brazil. She lives on Long Island, New York.


TANYA BASTIANICH MANUALI received her PhD in Renaissance art history from Oxford University, her MA from Syracuse University, and her BA from Georgetown University. She is the founder of an Italian food and wine tour company, Esperienze Italiane, the owner and Executive Producer at Tavola Productions, and manages the Lidia brand and food line. She co-authors cookbooks with her mother and brother and lives on Long Island in New York.
Reviews
"One of America's great Italian cooks. . . . A collection of more than 400 of [Lidia's] favorite recipes, from a wide enough range of categories that you could cook quite happily from it for several years." --Los Angeles Times

"A kind of accessible one-stop shopping for the gastronomy of Italy." --NPR

"You'll come away knowing how to gauge the freshness of an artichoke (it should squeak when squeezed), how to make a delicious simple cacio e pepe (cheese and pepper) pasta dish for 'days when you need simplicity in your life but still want a wallop of flavor'; and how to tell a trattoria from an osteria in Italy (the former has tablecloths and service; the latter is more informal with no linens and often has shared tables)." --Chicago Tribune

"The sort of book that will inevitably be well-used and well-loved." --Eater