Iqbal and His Ingenious Idea: How a Science Project Helps One Family and the Planet

(Author) (Illustrator)
Available

Product Details

Price
$18.99  $17.66
Publisher
Kids Can Press
Publish Date
Pages
32
Dimensions
9.2 X 12.1 X 0.5 inches | 1.05 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781771387200

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About the Author

Elizabeth Suneby loves words! Writing helps Liz come up with new ideas, learn new things, figure out her feelings and express them to others. Writing is also how Liz earns a living. She writes content for companies large and small. She writes magazine articles. And she writes books for children and teens that help kids find their voice in a hopeful world.

Rebecca Green is an illustrator and painter whose work can be found in children's books, magazines and galleries. She lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

Reviews

... informative ...--Booklist
Deftly promotes a positive message about embracing and harnessing one's curiosity and intelligence to make a difference.--Kirkus Reviews
An excellent example of how children can apply science to problem solving.--School Library Journal
... another successful entry in this series of encouraging stories about children empowered by education and engaged in problem-solving in their communities.--Publishers Weekly
Iqbal's story is great fun and comes with pearls of both cultural and environmental insights. Bravo to Iqbal for his ingenious idea. And kudos to Suneby and Green for raising awareness about solar cookers. I have seen first hand what a tremendous difference they make.--Khaled Hosseini, internationally acclaimed author, UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador, and former refugee
... a heart warming story about a child's resourcefulness supported by family love and school support.--Resource Links
... enjoyable ...--CM Magazine
Iqbal's story is steeped in the customs and language of Bangladesh while celebrating universal human qualities such as curiosity and ingenuity.--Science Magazine