Intraconnected: Mwe (Me + We) as the Integration of Self, Identity, and Belonging

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Product Details
Price
$29.99  $27.89
Publisher
W. W. Norton & Company
Publish Date
Pages
336
Dimensions
6.04 X 8.92 X 0.85 inches | 1.01 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780393711691

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About the Author
Noted neuropsychiatrist Daniel J. Siegel, MD, is clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine, and executive director of the Mindsight Institute in LA. He is founding editor of the Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology.
Reviews
Dr. Siegel's work is a love letter to humanity--both a road map and an appeal for us to understand the strength, basis, and innate connection that we all have and must become aware of in order to move beyond survival mode and into thriving mode. The reader of this elegant work will walk away with a deeper sense of intraconnection to all that exists and has ever existed in the universe. IntraConnected is a revelation, an awakening--Shelly Tygielski, author of Sit Down to Rise Up, and founder of Pandemic of Love
In an amazing dance of intellectual brilliance, heartfelt caring, and wise embrace, Dan Siegel invites us into the depth of his and our human story of development in order to examine, reflect, and melt the nature of the separate self. A new possibility of humanity arises when we authentically allow the possibility of intraconnectedness into our lives.--Thomas Hübl, PhD, founder, Academy of Inner Science, and author of Healing Collective Trauma: A Process for Integrating Our Intergenerational and Cultural Wounds
In his latest book, Dan Siegel explores a pathway toward a more sustainable way of being humans facing the multiple pandemics of our times together. Synthesizing insights from a range of disciplines and ways of knowing, he argues for expanding, evolving the notion of the self, from an isolated and separate 'me' to a relational, awe-embracing integrated sense--called, in his intriguing coinage, 'M We.' I know of no more encouraging prescription for what ails us at this time.--Rhonda V. Magee, M A, JD, author of The Inner Work of Racial Justice: Healing Ourselves and Transforming Our Communities Through Mindfulness