Imagery and GIS: Best Practices for Extracting Information from Imagery

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Product Details

Price
$119.99  $111.59
Publisher
Esri Press
Publish Date
Pages
444
Dimensions
7.9 X 9.9 X 1.0 inches | 2.6 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781589484542

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About the Author

Kass Green's more than 30-year career in remote sensing and GIS spans innovative research, multiscale and multisensor mapping projects, strategic planning, policy analysis, and the development of decision support tools for NGO's, public agencies and private companies throughout the world.
Dr. Russell G. Congalton is a professor of remote sensing and GIS at the University of New Hampshire. He has more than 35 years of experience in teaching and researching geospatial technologies working for private industry, federal and state agencies, and academia. He has authored over 150 papers, 10 book chapters, and four books on geospatial analysis.
Mark Tukman is the owner of Tukman Geospatial, based in Santa Rosa, California. He has more than 20 years of experience using imagery and other datasets to help public and private organizations map land cover, make decisions using spatial data, and support land conservation efforts.

Reviews

"[A] treasure trove of insights into the entire process of incorporating imagery into GIS objectives." - Midwest Book Review

Imagery and GIS is a well-rounded and approachable introductory remote sensing textbook clearly written with GIS users and community in mind. The quality of the book both in content and printing (e.g., color figures and fonts) combined with an excellent glossary and index, all at an affordable price, make it a very appealing textbook or reference.

--Benjamin W. Heumann, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan.

Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing Vol. 85, No. 3, March 2019, pp. 161-162.