Ideology and Inquisition: The World of the Censors in Early Mexico

Available
Product Details
Price
$102.00
Publisher
Yale University Press
Publish Date
Pages
382
Dimensions
6.1 X 9.1 X 0.9 inches | 1.2 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780300140408

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About the Author

Martin Nesvig is assistant professor of history at the University of Miami. He is the editor of Local Religion in Colonial Mexico and Religious Culture in Modern Mexico.

Reviews
"Nesvig's book is a most useful instrument for those interested in adopting new perspectives to the approach of supposedly well-known subjects."--Raquel Gutierrez Estupinan, Sixteenth Century Journal--Raquel Gutierrez Estupinan "Sixteenth Century Journal "
"Erudite, thought-provoking, and meticulously researched."--Amos Megged, The Americas--Amos Megged "The Americas "

"Nesvig seamlessly combines prosopography with intellectual, institutional, and social history of a very high caliber to provide a vivid portrait of inquisitional thinking, successes, and failures in early colonial Mexico."--Eric Van Young, University of California, San Diego

--Eric Van Young
"A unique and thorough study of Inquisitional censors in the Mexican context."--;I>Catholic Library World--Rebecca Price "Catholic Library World "
"We like to think of the Spanish Inquisition as a well-oiled institution, efficiently stamping out dissent. In a marvelously crafted study, Martin Nesvig shows the many fault lines in such an account. The shibboleths of the past give way to a nuanced narrative, painstakingly based on archival research. Nesvig demonstrates that in Mexico, the Inquisition was a rather inefficient repressive apparatus, constantly changing and constitutionally riddled by competing ideological agendas. Nesvig sheds abundant new light on the workings of (canon) law in the early modern Spanish Empire. The flexibility with which censure and the law were applied could well explain the longevity of the empire."--Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra, University of Texas at Austin--Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra