Hugo

(Author) (Illustrator)
Available
Product Details
Price
$17.99  $16.73
Publisher
Candlewick Press (MA)
Publish Date
Pages
40
Dimensions
8.6 X 11.4 X 0.4 inches | 1.0 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781536212754

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About the Author
Atinuke is the author of many books for children, including three picture books illustrated by Angela Brooksbank: Baby Goes to Market, B Is for Baby, and Catch That Chicken! Born in Nigeria, Atinuke began her career as a traditional storyteller. She is the recipient of many awards, including a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor. Atinuke lives in Wales.

Birgitta Sif has illustrated a number of picture books, including The Tall Man and the Small Mouse, written by Mara Bergman, and Snowboy and the Last Tree Standing, written by Hiawyn Oram. She is also the author-illustrator of Frances Dean Who Loved to Dance and Dance and Oliver, which was short-listed for the Kate Greenaway medal. Birgitta Sif lives in Cambridge, England.
Reviews
A pigeon named Hugo enjoys the job of looking after a park in a Francophone city. . . . In this role reversal, human characters are seen as creatures needing care and community. Atinuke's engaging storytelling style works well in this picture book, giving Hugo a personality, voice, and purpose that young readers will latch onto. Soft-lined illustrations with gentle pastel colors use a well-paced mix of double-page spreads, full-page scenes, and small vignettes to capture a changing environment filled with diverse personalities. A layered, affecting story of friendship and community
--Kirkus Reviews

Hugo, the dapper, attentive pigeon who stars in this story by Atinuke (Too Small Tola) is warden of a park in a city that feels like Paris. . . . Loosely sketched, atmospheric drawings of the park by Sif (My Big, Dumb, Invisible Dragon) are illuminated with brilliant rays of light. . . . In this character-driven tale, the draw is the relationship between open, personable Hugo and the way his need draws solitary Aimée out of isolation.
--Publishers Weekly