Hope Farm

(Author)
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Product Details
Price
$17.00  $15.81
Publisher
Scribe Us
Publish Date
Pages
352
Dimensions
5.2 X 8.2 X 1.0 inches | 0.8 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781947534728
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author
Peggy Frew's debut novel, House of Sticks, won the 2010 Victorian Premier's Literary Award for an unpublished manuscript. Her story 'Home Visit' won The Age short story competition. She has been published in New Australian Stories 2, Kill Your Darlings, The Big Issue, and Meanjin. Peggy is also a member of the critically acclaimed and award-winning Melbourne band Art of Fighting. Her latest novel is Hope Farm.
Reviews

"Frew's second novel is an Australian cousin of T.C. Boyle's Drop City, Lauren Groff's Arcadia, and other novels about the failures of communal living, with additional connections to Esther Freud's Hideous Kinky and Ian McEwan's Atonement."
--Kirkus

"In exploring what happens to the love between a parent and child when the rules of that relationship dissolve, and where the freedoms overwhelm, Frew exposes the raw tenderness of loving but not being loved in return."
--The Guardian

"[E]legiac, storied...aligns itself with other novels in which children--out of rashness, anger or even ignorance--act out to terrible consequences. As with Briony in Ian McEwan's Atonement or Leo in L.P. Hartley's The Go-Between, these decisions are usually compounded by circumstance...Frew does not want to pass judgment though. She understands that the sadness of childhood is to grow up in circumstances over which you have little or no control."
--Sydney Morning Herald

"Hope Farm is a complex novel which tells the story of a mother and her child, yet ultimately looks at the choices we make, the reasons we make them and the consequences of our decisions. The result is a moving story, which is firmly placed in its historical and social context. The author is compassionate to her flawed characters and the reader is left with a sense of sadness but hope. In this carefully constructed novel Peggy Frew demonstrates her skill as a fine storyteller, crafting a captivating and suspenseful story which resonates long after the final page is turned."
--from the citation by the Australian State Library of Victoria for the International IMPAC Dublin Prize