Homelands and Empires: Indigenous Spaces, Imperial Fictions, and Competition for Territory in Northeastern North America, 1690-1763

Backorder (temporarily out of stock)
Product Details
Price
$57.44
Publisher
University of Toronto Press
Publish Date
Pages
352
Dimensions
7.0 X 9.9 X 0.8 inches | 1.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781442614055

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate
About the Author
Jeffers Lennox is an assistant professor in the Department of History at Wesleyan University.
Reviews
'This book is one of the best examinations of historical cartography ever written for the Northeast, and the 41 maps reproduced in the text provide a rich visual complement to Lennox's carefully crafted arguments.'--Jason Hall, Acadiensis, November 2017
'Highly Recommended.'--B. Osborne, Choice Magazine, vol 55:06:2018
"Jeffers Lennox's monograph is certainly one that historians of the Atlantic World, of empire, and of indigenous North America will want to read carefully. It is an ambitious book that largely fulfills its mission to make us question cartography as an objective science even as the Enlightenment was beginning to blossom."--Katherine Hermes, Central Connecticut State University, The New England Quarterly
"Homelands and Empiresis an excellent study of the struggle among Indigenous nations, the French, and the British for territorial sovereignty in Northeastern North America, what is now Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, PEI, and parts of Maine and Quebec. It is the best study available to lay out the complex negotiations over the region and how importantly they figured in diplomatic negotiations in the eighteenth century."--Elizabeth Mancke, Department of History, University of New Brunswick
"Jeffers Lennox's deep research, coupled with his good work in applying fresh insights about spatiality and cartographic knowledge make for a book that stands on its own as a signal contribution to our understanding of the northeastern regions of North America."--Chris Hodson, Department of History, BYU