He Called Me Sister: A True Story of Finding Humanity on Death Row

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Product Details

Price
$29.95  $27.85
Publisher
Morehouse Publishing
Publish Date
Pages
240
Dimensions
5.5 X 8.6 X 1.1 inches | 0.75 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781640655959

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About the Author

Suzanne Craig Robertson is a former statewide legal magazine editor and bar association communicator. She holds a Master of Arts in writing and lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

Bill Moyers is a veteran journalist, broadcaster, and author. Former managing editor of Moyers & Company and BillMoyers.com, his previous shows on PBS included NOW with Bill Moyers and Bill Moyers Journal. Over the past three and a half decades he has become an icon of American journalism and is the author of many books, including Bill Moyers Journal: The Conversation Continues, Moyers on Democracy, and Healing and the Mind. He was one of the organizers of the Peace Corps, a special assistant for Lyndon B. Johnson, a publisher of Newsday, senior correspondent for CBS News, and a producer of many groundbreaking series on public television. He is the winner of more than 30 Emmys, nine Peabodys, three George Polk awards.

Sister Helen Prejean, CSJ is a member of the Congregation of St. Joseph and author of the bestselling book Dead Man Walking.

Reviews

"This is Suzanne Craig Robertson's moving story of a death in Tennessee. While disquieting and troubling, the story is gracefully intimate, respectful of all parties, tender and moving. She subtly honors the emotions inevitable in a story of innocence and guilt; of our collectively taking a life; of race and politics, right and wrong, and of wrestling with questions haunted by biblical memories that we confront every day." -Bill Moyers

"Here's the truth: I choked up on the dedication page of this book and now, weeks later, I am still tearing up at random moments, still thinking about this incredibly moving story. Suzanne Robertson takes us with her and her family on a journey to a place that few of us want to see or understand better-but, for the sake of our humanity and community, desperately need to: Death Row. We are introduced to an inmate, Cecil Johnson, who is also a poet, a cook, a football fan, a once-neglected child, a family member, a friend, and a man for whom the justice system did not work as it should. To my amazement, the author gives us moments to laugh on this journey, moments of wonder and even beauty-as well as plenty of moments to weep. He Called Me Sister is a story of becoming family with someone whose life experiences could not be more different, a tale of tragedy and mishandled evidence and crushed dreams-but also of authentic connection and goodness and hope. He Called Me Sister is a must read for all those who are pro-death penalty, all those who are anti-death penalty and, truly, everyone in between." -Joy Jordan-Lake, bestselling author of A Tangled Mercy and Why Jesus Makes Me Nervous

"In this carefully reported, heartrending story of her family's personal relationship with a Death Row prisoner, Suzanne Craig Robertson interrogates the justice system's deep inequities, as well as her own journey from trusting in the system to seeing it for what it is-human-made, biased, and deeply flawed. He Called Me Sister is a captivating story of the power of showing up for one another, of choosing to be in community even in the face of ultimate unknowns." -Erin Keane, author of Runaway: Notes of the Myths that Made Me

"Pregnant with a sense of tragedy and wrestling with what could have been, He Called Me Sister is a touching memoir about how faith and love reached beyond prison bars."-Foreword Review


"This is Suzanne Craig Robertson's moving story of a death in Tennessee. While disquieting and troubling, the story is gracefully intimate, respectful of all parties, tender and moving. She subtly honors the emotions inevitable in a story of innocence and guilt; of our collectively taking a life; of race and politics, right and wrong, and of wrestling with questions haunted by biblical memories that we confront every day." --Bill Moyers

"Here's the truth: I choked up on the dedication page of this book and now, weeks later, I am still tearing up at random moments, still thinking about this incredibly moving story. Suzanne Robertson takes us with her and her family on a journey to a place that few of us want to see or understand better--but, for the sake of our humanity and community, desperately need to: Death Row. We are introduced to an inmate, Cecil Johnson, who is also a poet, a cook, a football fan, a once-neglected child, a family member, a friend, and a man for whom the justice system did not work as it should. To my amazement, the author gives us moments to laugh on this journey, moments of wonder and even beauty--as well as plenty of moments to weep. He Called Me Sister is a story of becoming family with someone whose life experiences could not be more different, a tale of tragedy and mishandled evidence and crushed dreams--but also of authentic connection and goodness and hope. He Called Me Sister is a must read for all those who are pro-death penalty, all those who are anti-death penalty and, truly, everyone in between." --Joy Jordan-Lake, bestselling author of A Tangled Mercy and Why Jesus Makes Me Nervous

"In this carefully reported, heartrending story of her family's personal relationship with a Death Row prisoner, Suzanne Craig Robertson interrogates the justice system's deep inequities, as well as her own journey from trusting in the system to seeing it for what it is--human-made, biased, and deeply flawed. He Called Me Sister is a captivating story of the power of showing up for one another, of choosing to be in community even in the face of ultimate unknowns." --Erin Keane, author of Runaway: Notes of the Myths that Made Me

"Pregnant with a sense of tragedy and wrestling with what could have been, He Called Me Sister is a touching memoir about how faith and love reached beyond prison bars."--Foreword Review