Global Dystopias

(Editor)
Available

Product Details

Price
$19.95  $18.55
Publisher
Boston Review
Publish Date
Pages
208
Dimensions
6.6 X 10.2 X 0.5 inches | 0.95 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781946511041

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Junot Díaz is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao and the short story collections Drown and This Is How You Lose Her. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Story, and Best American Short Stories. Associate Professor in the Writing and Humanistic Studies Program at MIT, he is fiction editor of Boston Review.

Junot Díaz is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao and the short story collections Drown and This Is How You Lose Her. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Story, and Best American Short Stories. Associate Professor in the Writing and Humanistic Studies Program at MIT, he is fiction editor of Boston Review.

Junot Díaz is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao and the short story collections Drown and This Is How You Lose Her. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Story, and Best American Short Stories. Associate Professor in the Writing and Humanistic Studies Program at MIT, he is fiction editor of Boston Review.

Reviews

Some of the best contributions, many of them by women, include nuanced examinations of gender-based oppression. In Charlie Jane Anders's astoundingly good "Don't Press Charges and I Won't Sue," the narrator is forced by the government into a body she doesn't want and didn't ask for. Maria Dahvana Headley's "Memoirs of an Imaginary Country" explores the connection between the colonization of women's bodies and colonization of non-Western countries. Tananarive Due's "The Reformatory" reveals a single moment of horrific abuse in a young black boy's difficult life. Maureen McHugh's "Cannibal Acts" and Nalo Hopkinson's "Waving at Trains" are both excellent stories of viral apocalypses and their aftermath.--Publishers Weekly--