Economy of the Unlost: (reading Simonides of Keos with Paul Celan) (Revised)

(Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$32.95
Publisher
Princeton University Press
Publish Date
Pages
160
Dimensions
6.18 X 9.2 X 0.47 inches | 0.56 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780691091754
BISAC Categories:

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Anne Carson is a poet, essayist and scholar of classics who lives in Montreal. Her first book, Eros the Bittersweet: An Essay (Princeton), has recently been reissued by The Dalkey Archive. Her most recent book, Autobiography of Red: A Novel in Verse (Knopf), was nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry.

Reviews

"Erudite and entertaining, effortlessly able to play across a range of associations, the book traces a number of similarities in artistic approach between two writers who would seem, on the face of it, to have inhabited very different worlds . . . Economy of the Unlost is a beguiling piece of work, both scholarly and persuasive."---Elizabeth Lowry, London Review of Books
"This is one of those rewarding, original, rigorously attentive books that only Anne Carson could have written. At its core is an idea-the way the overlapping senses of 'economy' play out in language and in monetary history-that only this brilliant poet/classicist could have come up with. Economy of the Unlost is a strange book, bringing together as it does Simonides and Paul Celan; but its strangeness is one of its great virtues, for startling insights spring uncannily off every page."---Wendy Lesser, Editor, The Threepenny Review
"[A] magnificent and lovely essay. . . . I never wanted [the] book to end. .. ."-- "Stanley Corngold, Modernism/Modernity"
"[Carson] convincingly draws out the fraternity of tone and inclination in two poets far removed in time, experience, and language, a significant accomplishment. It is. . . .difficult to do full justice to her book--rich, delicate, and complex. . . . An act of grace."---Danielle Allen, Chicago Review