Desmond and the Very Mean Word

(Author) (Illustrator)
Available

Product Details

Price
$17.99  $16.73
Publisher
Candlewick Press (MA)
Publish Date
Pages
32
Dimensions
10.0 X 11.4 X 0.4 inches | 1.05 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780763652296

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Archbishop Desmond Tutu (1931-2021) was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 for his lifelong struggle to bring equality, justice, and peace to his native country of South Africa. He also served as Archbishop of Cape Town, South Africa, from 1986 until 1996. In 1995, former South African President Nelson Mandela asked him to lead the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which became a model of national forgiveness and coexistence. Archbishop Tutu co-authored God Has a Dream: A Vision of Hope for Our Time and is the author of Desmond and the Very Mean Word. Douglas Carlton Abrams is the co-author with Archbishop Tutu of God's Dream. His many books have been translated into more than two dozen languages. He lives in California. A. G. Ford is the illustrator of the New York Times bestseller Barack by Jonah Winter and Michelle by Deborah Hopkinson. He also illustrated Goal! by Mina Javaherbin. He lives in Dallas, Texas.

Reviews

[A] heart-rending story...
--The New York Times Book Review

Ford's oil illustrations do a fine job of capturing the dusty days of township life, as well as Desmond's dark nights of the soul.
--Publishers Weekly

A thought-provoking lesson for young readers on the destructiveness of bullying and racism.
--Kirkus Reviews

Writing again with Abrams (God's Dream, 2008), Tutu offers a clear telling that feels much like a children's homily, the earnest tone and clean language (the offending word is never mentioned) reflecting his own wholesome spirit. Ford's dynamic paintings, with well-defined outlines and dramatic light, match the clarity of the narrative. The images fill the large-trim spreads, capturing the immediacy of the conflict and the tranquility of the resolution.
--Booklist

Archbishop Tutu describes the power of words and the secret of forgiveness in a story from his South African childhood during apartheid...The story avoids a preachy tone by staying true to Desmond's emotions and his struggle to reach a moral high ground. The book is both a lesson and a slice of life, giving insight into the person Archbishop Tutu became as an adult.
--School Library Journal