Dad, Jackie, and Me

(Author) (Illustrator)
& 1 more
Backorder (temporarily out of stock)
Product Details
Price
$8.99  $8.36
Publisher
Peachtree Publishers
Publish Date
Pages
32
Dimensions
9.46 X 11.04 X 0.15 inches | 0.41 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781561455317

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate
About the Author
Myron Uhlberg is the award-wining and critically acclaimed author of several children's books. Uhlberg is the first-born son of two deaf parents. His first language was ASL (American Sign Language). After graduating from Brandeis University, he served as a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division. He then spent the next forty years in the garment industry. His first book was published when he was sixty-six years old. He has appeared on NPR's Talk of the Nation and was featured in the Ken Burns documentary film, Jackie Robinson. He lives in California.

Colin Bootman was born in Trinidad but moved to the United States at the age of seven. A graduate of the School of Visual Arts in New York, he has illustrated numerous books for children, including Almost to Freedom, a Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Book. He lives in New York.
Reviews
"Genuinely affecting. . . Bootman's realistic, wonderfully expressive watercolor paintings capture the fashions and flavor of 1940's New York in muted brows and greens. The endpapers, an actual scrapbook of old newspaper articles about Robinson, provide a satisfying context for this ultimately upbeat, multi-dimensional story."--Kirkus Reviews

"An affecting tribute to Robinson, to a dedicated son and to a thoughtful, deep-feeling father. And, of course, to baseball."--Publishers Weekly

"It takes the young Uhlberg, narrator of the story, a while to overcome his embarrassment at his father's attempts to cheer for Robinson. . . but eventually Dad's devotion wins the day in a moving finale. Colin Bootman, who earned a Coretta Scott Honor Award for Almost to Freedom (2003), uses evocative watercolors rich in soft browns and lush greens to capture both the feel of the 1940s (fedora-wearing fans) and the electricity of Robinson's play."--Booklist

"Bootman's lovely watercolor paintings add detail and wistful nostalgia. . . [readers] will appreciate the story's insightful treatment of deafness as viewed through the eyes of a child."--School Library Journal