Creating an Ethical Jewish Life: A Practical Introduction to Classic Teachings on How to Be a Jew

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Product Details
Price
$19.95  $18.55
Publisher
Jewish Lights Publishing
Publish Date
Pages
336
Dimensions
6.0 X 0.7 X 9.0 inches | 1.0 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781580231145
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author
Harold Kasimow, a Holocaust survivor, is the George Drake Professor of Religious Studies at Grinnell College in Iowa. He is the author of 'Divine-Human Encounter'. Byron L. Sherwin is Distinguished Service Professor of Jewish Philosophy and Mysticism and Director of Doctoral Programs at Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies. He is the author of 'Crafting the Soul' and 'Sparks Amidst the Ashes'.
Dr. Seymour J. Cohen (zl) opened up to English readers the previously little-known genre of medieval Jewish ethical literature through his masterful translations of its classics, including The Ways of the Righteous; The Book of the Righteous and The Holy Letter. He was president of the Rabbinical Assembly and the Synagogue Council of America.
Reviews

Dr. Sherwin and the late Rabbi Seymour Cohen have created an excellent handbook of Jewish ethical values and literature. Their introduction tells us that life is an art form--an invitation to Jewish ethical living. "It is the human task to complete God's unfinished artistic masterpiece--the human person."

The classic texts of Jewish ethical literature--works little-known to most of us--are now readily available for personal study. This one-of-a-kind book brings the genre of Jewish ethical literature from its origins in the ancient and medieval worlds, straight into our 21st-century lives.

An invitation into a history rich with wisdom and guidance, Creating an Ethical Jewish Life offers traditional texts, clear explanations, and ways for us to use them in our lives. Rabbis Sherwin and Cohen highlight a wide variety of classic texts, including the Zohar, The Holy Letter, The Path of the Upright by Moshe Hayyim Luzzatto, Duties of the Heart by Bahya ibn Pakudah, and Nachmanides' Commentary on the Torah. These timeless texts are combined with the authors' insightful commentary to address the ultimate human moral issue, the most intimate personal question: How can I best live the life God has entrusted into my care? With expertise and passion, Sherwin and Cohen show us how these unusual texts not only inform--but can transform our lives.

This excellent anthology explores how to: Deal with ego - Be wise - Be healthy - Employ wealth - Die - Behave sexually - Believe in God - Thank God - Love God - Study the Torah - Repent - Treat one's parents - Parent - Speak about another - Be Philanthropic, and much more.

Dr. Byron L. Sherwin, a leading scholar in Jewish theology, has served for over thirty years as professor of Jewish philosophy and mysticism at Chicago's Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies, where he is also Vice President for Academic Affairs. Rabbi Sherwin is the author of twenty-five books and over 150 articles and monographs; his works include Why Be Good?; In Partnership with God: Contemporary Jewish Law and Ethics; and Jewish Ethics for the 21st Century. Active in international Jewish communal affairs and interfaith relations, in 1992 Rabbi Sherwin was the first recipient of the "Man of Reconciliation" award from the Polish Council of Christians and Jews.

The late Dr. Seymour J. Cohen has opened up to English readers the previously little-known genre of medieval Jewish ethical literature through his masterful translations of three of its classics: The Ways of the Righteous, The Book of the Righteous, and The Holy Letter. Rabbi Cohen served as president of the Rabbinical Assembly and the Synagogue Council of America.

Their anthology is an excellent adult education textbook, or a book to read by an individual. Highly recommended.

--Dov Peretz Elkins "Jewish Media Review "